Continuity and discontinuity of trouble sleeping behaviors from early childhood to young adulthood in a large Australian community-based-birth cohort study

Al Mamun, Abdullah, O'Callaghan, Frances, Scott, James, Heussler, Helen, O'Callaghan, Michael, Najman, Jake and Williams, Gail (2012) Continuity and discontinuity of trouble sleeping behaviors from early childhood to young adulthood in a large Australian community-based-birth cohort study. Sleep Medicine, 13 10: 1301-1306. doi:10.1016/j.sleep.2012.07.003


Author Al Mamun, Abdullah
O'Callaghan, Frances
Scott, James
Heussler, Helen
O'Callaghan, Michael
Najman, Jake
Williams, Gail
Title Continuity and discontinuity of trouble sleeping behaviors from early childhood to young adulthood in a large Australian community-based-birth cohort study
Journal name Sleep Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1389-9457
1878-5506
Publication date 2012-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.sleep.2012.07.003
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 13
Issue 10
Start page 1301
End page 1306
Total pages 6
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Little is known about pulse pressure (PP) during early life and its association with renal function at young adulthood. This study describes an early life course association of PP with adult renal function at 30 years from a large community-based birth cohort study in Australia.
Formatted abstract
Objective: To examine the continuity and discontinuity of trouble sleeping behaviors (TSB) from childhood to adolescence and young adulthood in a community-based prospective birth cohort study.
Methods: The original study comprised 7223 mother-offspring pairs who were followed prospectively at pregnancy, 6. months, 5, 14 and 21. years post-delivery. Participant numbers differ by follow-up stages. There were 3184 offspring for whom we have consistently collected information on TSB retrospectively at 2-4. years, and prospectively at 14 and 21. years of age.
Results: These comprised maternal-reported offspring TSB at 2-4. years and 14. years, and offspring-reported trouble sleeping at 14 and 21. years. One in two children had persistent trouble sleeping from 2-4 to 14. years and two-thirds from 14 to 21. years. In the adjusted analysis, compared with 2-4-years-old children with no trouble sleeping, those who experienced trouble sleeping were 1.20 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.44) times more likely to have trouble sleeping at 21. years. Similarly, adolescents who experienced trouble sleeping were 1.94 (95% CI: 1.66, 2.27) times more likely to experience trouble sleeping at 21. years.
Conclusions: There is a continuity of TSB from early childhood through adolescence and young adulthood, although the persistence of TSB is strongest from adolescence to young adulthood. Interventions improving sleep in young children may prevent longer term difficulties in adolescents and young adults.
Keyword Adolescence
Childhood
Trouble sleeping
Young adulthood
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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