Experimentally induced blood stage malaria infection as a tool for clinical research

Engwerda, Christian R., Minigo, Gabriela, Amante, Fiona H. and McCarthy, James S. (2012) Experimentally induced blood stage malaria infection as a tool for clinical research. Trends in Parasitology, 28 11: 515-521. doi:10.1016/j.pt.2012.09.001


Author Engwerda, Christian R.
Minigo, Gabriela
Amante, Fiona H.
McCarthy, James S.
Title Experimentally induced blood stage malaria infection as a tool for clinical research
Journal name Trends in Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-4922
1471-5007
Publication date 2012-11-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.pt.2012.09.001
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 28
Issue 11
Start page 515
End page 521
Total pages 7
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 2725 Infectious Diseases
2405 Parasitology
Abstract A system for experimentally induced blood stage malaria infection (IBSM) with Plasmodium falciparum by direct intravenous inoculation of infected erythrocytes was developed at the Queensland Institute of Medical Research (QIMR) more than 15 years ago. Since that time, this system has been used in several studies to investigate the protective effect of vaccines, the clearance kinetics of parasites following drug treatment, and to improve understanding of the early events in blood stage infection. In this article, we will review the development of IBSM and the applications for which it is being employed. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of IBSM, and finish by describing some exciting new areas of research that have been made possible by this system.
Keyword Malaria
Vaccines
Drugs
Immunity
Pathophysiology
IBSM
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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