Long-term outcomes of the Australasian Randomized Clinical Trial comparing laparoscopic and conventional open surgical treatments for colon cancer: The Australasian Laparoscopic Colon Cancer Study Trial

Bagshaw, Philip F., Allardyce, Randall A., Frampton, Christopher M., Frizelle, Francis A.., Hewett, Peter J., McMurrick, Paul J., Rieger, Nicholas A., Smith, J. Shona, Solomon, Michael J., Stevenson, Andrew R. L. and Australasian Laparoscopic Colon Cancer Study Group (2012) Long-term outcomes of the Australasian Randomized Clinical Trial comparing laparoscopic and conventional open surgical treatments for colon cancer: The Australasian Laparoscopic Colon Cancer Study Trial. Annals of Surgery, 256 6: 915-919. doi:10.1097/SLA.0b013e3182765ff8

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Author Bagshaw, Philip F.
Allardyce, Randall A.
Frampton, Christopher M.
Frizelle, Francis A..
Hewett, Peter J.
McMurrick, Paul J.
Rieger, Nicholas A.
Smith, J. Shona
Solomon, Michael J.
Stevenson, Andrew R. L.
Australasian Laparoscopic Colon Cancer Study Group
Title Long-term outcomes of the Australasian Randomized Clinical Trial comparing laparoscopic and conventional open surgical treatments for colon cancer: The Australasian Laparoscopic Colon Cancer Study Trial
Journal name Annals of Surgery   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-4932
1528-1140
Publication date 2012-12-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/SLA.0b013e3182765ff8
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 256
Issue 6
Start page 915
End page 919
Total pages 5
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
Language eng
Abstract Objective: We report a multicentered randomized controlled trial across Australia and New Zealand comparing laparoscopic-assisted colon resection (LCR) with open colon resection (OCR) for colon cancer.
Formatted abstract
Objective: We report a multicentered randomized controlled trial across Australia and New Zealand comparing laparoscopic-assisted colon resection (LCR) with open colon resection (OCR) for colon cancer. 
Background: Colon cancer is a significant worldwide health issue. This trial investigated whether the short-term benefits associated with LCR for colon cancer could be achieved safely, without survival disadvantages, in our region.
Methods: A total of 601 patients with potentially curable colon cancer were randomized to receive LCR or OCR. Primary endpoints were 5-year overall survival,  recurrence-free survival, and freedom from recurrence rates, compared using an intention-to-treat analysis.
Results: On April 5, 2010, 587 eligible patients were followed for a median of 5.2 years (range, 1 week–11.4 years) with 5-year confirmed follow-up data for survival and recurrence on 567 (96.6%). Significant differences between the 2 trial groups were as follows: LCR patients were older at randomization, and their pathology specimens showed smaller distal resection margins; OCR patients had some worse pathology parameters, but there were no differences in disease stages. There were no significant differences between the LCR and OCR groups in 5-year follow-up of overall survival (77.7% vs 76.0%, P = 0.64), recurrence-free survival (72.7% vs 71.2%, P = 0.70), or freedom from recurrence (86.2% vs 85.6%, P = 0.85).
Conclusions: In spite of some differences in short-termsurrogate oncological
markers, LCR was not inferior to OCR in direct measures of survival and disease recurrence. These findings emphasize the importance of long-term data in formulating evidence-based practice guidelines.
Keyword Clinical Trial
Colon cancer
Colon surgery
Laparoscopy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 97/154
207815
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 71 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Sat, 24 Nov 2012, 00:16:47 EST by Andrew Stevenson on behalf of Surgery - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital