Quantifying the physical demands of collision sports: does microsensor technology measure what it claims to measure?

Gabbett, Tim J. (2013) Quantifying the physical demands of collision sports: does microsensor technology measure what it claims to measure?. Journal of Strength And Conditioning Research, 27 8: 2319-2322. doi:10.1519/JSC.0b013e318277fd21


Author Gabbett, Tim J.
Title Quantifying the physical demands of collision sports: does microsensor technology measure what it claims to measure?
Journal name Journal of Strength And Conditioning Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1064-8011
1533-4287
Publication date 2013-08-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0b013e318277fd21
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 27
Issue 8
Start page 2319
End page 2322
Total pages 4
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The physical demands of rugby league, rugby union, and American football are significantly increased through the large number of collisions players are required to perform during match-play. Due to the labour-intensive nature of coding collisions from video recordings, manufacturers of wearable microsensor (e.g. global position system, GPS) units have refined the technology to automatically detect collisions, with several sport scientists attempting to use these microsensors to quantify the physical demands of collision sports. However, a question remains over the validity of these microtechnology units to quantify the contact demands of collision sports. Indeed, recent evidence has shown significant differences in the number of "impacts" recorded by microtechnology units (GPSports, Canberra, Australia) and the actual number of collisions coded from video. However, a separate study investigated the validity of a different microtechnology unit (minimaxX, Catapult Sports, Melbourne, Australia) that included GPS and tri-axial accelerometers, and also a gyroscope and magnetometer, to quantify collisions. Collisions detected by the minimaxX unit were compared with video-based coding of the actual events. No significant differences were detected in the number of mild, moderate, and heavy collisions detected via the minimaxX units and those coded from video recordings of the actual event. Furthermore, a strong correlation (r = 0.96, P<0.01) was observed between collisions recorded via the minimaxX units and those coded from video recordings of the event. These findings demonstrate that only one commercially available and wearable microtechnology unit (minimaxX) can be considered capable of offering a valid method of quantifying the contact loads that typically occur in collision sports. Until such validation research is completed, sport scientists should be circumspect of the ability of other units to perform similar functions.
Keyword Collision
Sport
Microsensor
Contact sport
Microtechnology
Head acceleration
Football
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Publish Ahead of Print 19 October 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 20 Nov 2012, 23:50:40 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences