Dissecting Arabidopsis Gβ signal transduction on the protein surface1[W][OA]

Jiang, Kun, Frick-Cheng, Arwen, Trusov, Yuri, Delgado-Cerezo, Magdalena, Rosenthal, David M., Lorek, Justine, Panstruga, Ralph, Booker, Fitzgerald L., Botella, Jose Ramon, Molina, Antonio, Ort, Donald R. and Jones, Alan M. (2012) Dissecting Arabidopsis Gβ signal transduction on the protein surface1[W][OA]. Plant Physiology, 159 3: 975-983. doi:10.1104/pp.112.196337


Author Jiang, Kun
Frick-Cheng, Arwen
Trusov, Yuri
Delgado-Cerezo, Magdalena
Rosenthal, David M.
Lorek, Justine
Panstruga, Ralph
Booker, Fitzgerald L.
Botella, Jose Ramon
Molina, Antonio
Ort, Donald R.
Jones, Alan M.
Title Dissecting Arabidopsis Gβ signal transduction on the protein surface1[W][OA]
Formatted title
Dissecting Arabidopsis Gβ signal transduction on the protein surface1[W][OA]
Journal name Plant Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0032-0889
1532-2548
Publication date 2012-07-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1104/pp.112.196337
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 159
Issue 3
Start page 975
End page 983
Total pages 9
Place of publication Rockville, MD, United States
Publisher American Society of Plant Biologists
Language eng
Abstract The heterotrimeric G-protein complex provides signal amplification and target specificity. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) G beta-subunit of this complex (AGB1) interacts with and modulates the activity of target cytoplasmic proteins. This specificity resides in the structure of the interface between AGB1 and its targets. Important surface residues of AGB1, which were deduced from a comparative evolutionary approach, were mutated to dissect AGB1-dependent physiological functions. Analysis of the capacity of these mutants to complement well-established phenotypes of G beta-null mutants revealed AGB1 residues critical for specific AGB1-mediated biological processes, including growth architecture, pathogen resistance, stomata-mediated leaf-air gas exchange, and possibly photosynthesis. These findings provide promising new avenues to direct the finely tuned engineering of crop yield and traits.
Formatted abstract
The heterotrimeric G-protein complex provides signal amplification and target specificity. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Gβ-subunit of this complex (AGB1) interacts with and modulates the activity of target cytoplasmic proteins. This specificity resides in the structure of the interface between AGB1 and its targets. Important surface residues of AGB1, which were deduced from a comparative evolutionary approach, were mutated to dissect AGB1-dependent physiological functions. Analysis of the capacity of these mutants to complement well-established phenotypes of Gβ-null mutants revealed AGB1 residues critical for specific AGB1-mediated biological processes, including growth architecture, pathogen resistance, stomata-mediated leaf-air gas exchange, and possibly photosynthesis. These findings provide promising new avenues to direct the finely tuned engineering of crop yield and traits.
Keyword Heterotrimeric G-Protein
Alpha-Subunit Gpa1
Abscisic-Acid
Seed-Germination
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID R01GM065989
MCB-0723515
SFB670
BIO2009-07161
DE-FG02-05er15671
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2013 Collection
 
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