High neighborhood walkability mitigates declines in middle-to-older aged adults' walking for transport

Shimura, Hiroko, Sugiyama, Takemi, Winkler, Elisabeth and Owen, Neville (2012) High neighborhood walkability mitigates declines in middle-to-older aged adults' walking for transport. Journal of Physical Activity & Health, 9 7: 1004-1008.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Shimura, Hiroko
Sugiyama, Takemi
Winkler, Elisabeth
Owen, Neville
Title High neighborhood walkability mitigates declines in middle-to-older aged adults' walking for transport
Journal name Journal of Physical Activity & Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Publication date 2012-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 9
Issue 7
Start page 1004
End page 1008
Total pages 5
Place of publication Champaign, IL, United States
Publisher Human Kinetics
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Neighborhood walkability shows significant positive relationship with residents' walking for transport in cross-sectional studies. We examined prospective relationships of neighborhood walkability with the change in walking behaviors over 4 years among middle-to-older aged adults (50-65 years) residing in Adelaide, Australia.

Methods: A baseline survey was conducted during 2003-2004, and a follow-up survey during 2007-2008. Walking for transport and walking for recreation were assessed at both times among 504 adults aged 50-65 years living in objectively determined high- and low-walkable neighborhoods. Multilevel linear regression analyses examined the associations of neighborhood walkability with changes over 4 years in walking for transport and walking for recreation.

Results: On average, participants decreased their time spent in walking for transport (-4.1 min/day) and for recreation (-3.7 min/day) between the baseline and 4-year follow-up. However, those living in high-walkable neighborhoods showed significantly smaller reduction (adjusted mean change: -1.1 min/day) in their time spent in walking for transport than did those living in low-walkable neighborhoods (-6.7 min/day). No such statistically-significant differences were found with the changes in walking for recreation.

Conclusions: High-walkable neighborhoods may help middle-to-older aged adults to maintain their walking for transport.
Keyword Walking
Physical activity
Built environment
Health promotion
Australia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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