Serum vitamin D levels are lower in Australian children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes than in children without diabetes

Greer, Ristan M., Portelli, Sharon L., Hung, Betsy Shin-Min, Cleghorn, Geoffrey J., McMahon, Sarah K., Batch, Jennifer A. and Conwell, Louise S. (2013) Serum vitamin D levels are lower in Australian children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes than in children without diabetes. Pediatric Diabetes, 14 1: 31-41. doi:10.1111/j.1399-5448.2012.00890.x

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Author Greer, Ristan M.
Portelli, Sharon L.
Hung, Betsy Shin-Min
Cleghorn, Geoffrey J.
McMahon, Sarah K.
Batch, Jennifer A.
Conwell, Louise S.
Title Serum vitamin D levels are lower in Australian children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes than in children without diabetes
Journal name Pediatric Diabetes   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1399-543X
1399-5448
Publication date 2013-01-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1399-5448.2012.00890.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 14
Issue 1
Start page 31
End page 41
Total pages 11
Place of publication Malden, MA, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 2724 Internal Medicine
2735 Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
2712 Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
Abstract Vitamin D is synthesised in the skin through the action of UVB radiation (sunlight), and 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD) measured in serum as a marker of vitamin D status. Several studies, mostly conducted in high latitudes, have shown an association between type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and low serum 25OHD. We conducted a casecontrol study to determine whether, in a sub-tropical environment with abundant sunlight (latitude 27.5 degrees S), children with T1DM have lower serum vitamin D than children without diabetes. Fifty-six children with T1DM (14 newly diagnosed) and 46 unrelated control children participated in the study. Serum 25OHD, 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) and selected biochemical indices were measured. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms Taq1, Fok1, and Apa1 were genotyped. Fitzpatrick skin classification, self-reported daily hours of outdoor exposure, and mean UV index over the 35?d prior to blood collection were recorded. Serum 25OHD was lower in children with T1DM (n?=?56) than in controls (n?=?46) [mean (95%CI)?=?78.7 (71.885.6) nmol/L vs. 91.4 (83.598.7) nmol/L, p?=?0.02]. T1DM children had lower self-reported outdoor exposure and mean UV exposure, but no significant difference in distribution of VDR polymorphisms. 25OHD remained lower in children with T1DM after covariate adjustment. Children newly diagnosed with T1DM had lower 1,25(OH)2D [median (IQR)?=?89 (68122) pmol/L] than controls [121 (108159) pmol/L, p?=?0.03], or children with established diabetes [137 (113153) pmol/L, p?=?0.01]. Children with T1DM have lower 25OHD than controls, even in an environment of abundant sunlight. Whether low vitamin D is a risk factor or consequence of T1DM is unknown.
Formatted abstract
Vitamin D is synthesised in the skin through the action of UVB radiation (sunlight), and 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD) measured in serum as a marker of vitamin D status. Several studies, mostly conducted in high latitudes, have shown an association between type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and low serum 25OHD. We conducted a case–control study to determine whether, in a sub-tropical environment with abundant sunlight (latitude 27.5°S), children with T1DM have lower serum vitamin D than children without diabetes. Fifty-six children with T1DM (14 newly diagnosed) and 46 unrelated control children participated in the study. Serum 25OHD, 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) and selected biochemical indices were measured. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms Taq1, Fok1, and Apa1 were genotyped. Fitzpatrick skin classification, self-reported daily hours of outdoor exposure, and mean UV index over the 35 d prior to blood collection were recorded. Serum 25OHD was lower in children with T1DM (n = 56) than in controls (n = 46) [mean (95%CI) = 78.7 (71.8–85.6) nmol/L vs. 91.4 (83.5–98.7) nmol/L, p = 0.02]. T1DM children had lower self-reported outdoor exposure and mean UV exposure, but no significant difference in distribution of VDR polymorphisms. 25OHD remained lower in children with T1DM after covariate adjustment. Children newly diagnosed with T1DM had lower 1,25(OH)2D [median (IQR) = 89 (68–122) pmol/L] than controls [121 (108–159) pmol/L, p = 0.03], or children with established diabetes [137 (113–153) pmol/L, p = 0.01]. Children with T1DM have lower 25OHD than controls, even in an environment of abundant sunlight. Whether low vitamin D is a risk factor or consequence of T1DM is unknown.
Keyword Paediatrics
Type 1 diabetes
Vitamin D
Vitamin D receptor
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 23 AUG 2012

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 11 Nov 2012, 02:37:31 EST by Dr Louise Conwell on behalf of Paediatrics & Child Health - RBWH