Transient knockdown of tyrosine hydroxylase during development has persistent effects on behaviour in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio)

Formella, Isabel, Scott, Ethan, Burne, Thomas H.J., Lauren Harms, Liu, Pei-Yun, Karly Turner, Cui, Xiaoying and Eyles, Darryl (2012) Transient knockdown of tyrosine hydroxylase during development has persistent effects on behaviour in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio). PLoS ONE, 7 8: e42482.1-e42482.8. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0042482


Author Formella, Isabel
Scott, Ethan
Burne, Thomas H.J.
Lauren Harms
Liu, Pei-Yun
Karly Turner
Cui, Xiaoying
Eyles, Darryl
Title Transient knockdown of tyrosine hydroxylase during development has persistent effects on behaviour in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio)
Formatted title
Transient knockdown of tyrosine hydroxylase during development has persistent effects on behaviour in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio)
Journal name PLoS ONE   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2012-08-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0042482
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 7
Issue 8
Start page e42482.1
End page e42482.8
Total pages 8
Place of publication San Francisco, CA, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Language eng
Abstract Abnormal dopamine (DA) signaling is often suggested as causative in schizophrenia. The other prominent hypothesis for this disorder, largely driven by epidemiological data, is that certain adverse events during the early stages of brain development increase an individual's risk of developing schizophrenia later in life. However, the clinical and preclinical literature consistently implicates behavioural, cognitive, and pharmacological abnormalities, implying that DA signaling is abnormal in the adult brain. How can we reconcile these two major hypotheses underlying much of the clinical and basic research into schizophrenia? In this study we have transiently knocked down tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate limiting enzyme in DA synthesis) gene expression in the early stages of brain development in zebrafish using morpholinos. We show that by adulthood, TH and DA levels have returned to normal and basic DA-mediated behaviours, such as locomotion, are also normal. However, when they were exposed to a novel environment the levels of freezing and immediate positioning in deeper zones were significantly reduced in these adult fish. The neurochemistry underlying these behaviours is complex, and the exact mechanisms for these abnormal behaviours remains unknown. This study demonstrates that early transient alterations in DA ontogeny can produce persistent alterations in adult brain function and suggests that the zebrafish may be a promising model animal for future studies directed at clarifying the basic neurodevelopmental mechanisms behind complex psychiatric disease.
Keyword Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
MULTIDISCIPLINARY SCIENCES
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article # e42482

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2013 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 07 Nov 2012, 23:00:14 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute