Redd1 is a novel marker of testis development but is not required for normal male reproduction

Notini, A. J., McClive, P. J., Meachem, S. J., van den Bergen, J. A., Western, P. S., Gustin, S. E., Harley, V. R., Koopman, Peter A. and Sinclair, A. H. (2012) Redd1 is a novel marker of testis development but is not required for normal male reproduction. Sexual Development, 6 5: 223-230. doi:10.1159/000339723


Author Notini, A. J.
McClive, P. J.
Meachem, S. J.
van den Bergen, J. A.
Western, P. S.
Gustin, S. E.
Harley, V. R.
Koopman, Peter A.
Sinclair, A. H.
Title Redd1 is a novel marker of testis development but is not required for normal male reproduction
Formatted title
Redd1 is a novel marker of testis development but is not required for normal male reproduction
Journal name Sexual Development   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1661-5425
1661-5433
Publication date 2012-08-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1159/000339723
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 6
Issue 5
Start page 223
End page 230
Total pages 8
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher S. Karger
Language eng
Abstract In an effort to identify novel candidate genes involved in testis determination, we previously used suppression subtraction hybridisation PCR on male and female whole embryonic (12.0-12.5 days post coitum) mouse gonads. One gene to emerge from our screen was Redd1. In the current study, we demonstrate by whole-mount in situ hybridisation that Redd1 is differentially expressed in the developing mouse gonad at the time of sex determination, with higher expression in testis than ovary. Furthermore, Redd1 expression was first detected as Sry expression peaks, immediately prior to morphological sex determination, suggesting a potential role for Redd1 during testis development. To determine the functional importance of this gene during testis development, we generated Redd1-deficient mice. Morphologically, Redd1-deficient mice were indistinguishable from control littermates and showed normal fertility. Our results show that Redd1 alone is not required for testis development or fertility in mice. The lack of a male reproductive phenotype in Redd1 mice may be due to functional compensation by the related gene Redd2. Copyright (C) 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel
Formatted abstract
In an effort to identify novel candidate genes involved in testis determination, we previously used suppression subtraction hybridisation PCR on male and female whole embryonic (12.0–12.5 days post coitum) mouse gonads. One gene to emerge from our screen was Redd1. In the current study, we demonstrate by whole-mount in situ hybridisation that Redd1 is differentially expressed in the developing mouse gonad at the time of sex determination, with higher expression in testis than ovary. Furthermore, Redd1 expression was first detected as Sry expression peaks, immediately prior to morphological sex determination, suggesting a potential role for Redd1 during testis development. To determine the functional importance of this gene during testis development, we generated Redd1-deficient mice. Morphologically, Redd1-deficient mice were indistinguishable from control littermates and showed normal fertility. Our results show that Redd1 alone is not required for testis development or fertility in mice. The lack of a male reproductive phenotype in Redd1 mice may be due to functional compensation by the related gene Redd2.
Keyword Gonadogenesis
Murine
Redd1
Sex determination
Testis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 334314
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 22 Aug 2012, 01:38:19 EST by Susan Allen on behalf of Institute for Molecular Bioscience