Associations of physical activity and screen-time on health related quality of life in adults

Davies, Cally A., Vandelanotte, Corneel, Duncan, Mitch J. and van Uffelen, Jannique G.Z. (2012) Associations of physical activity and screen-time on health related quality of life in adults. Preventive Medicine, 55 1: 46-49. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.05.003

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Author Davies, Cally A.
Vandelanotte, Corneel
Duncan, Mitch J.
van Uffelen, Jannique G.Z.
Title Associations of physical activity and screen-time on health related quality of life in adults
Journal name Preventive Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0091-7435
1096-0260
Publication date 2012-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.05.003
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 55
Issue 1
Start page 46
End page 49
Total pages 4
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Associations between the combined effect of physical activity and screen based activities on health related quality of life remain largely undetermined.

Methods: During 2008-2010, cross-sectional data for self-reported health related quality of life, physical activity, and screen-time were collected for 3796 Australian adults. Logistic regression was conducted to examine associations for six combinations of physical activity (none, insufficient, and sufficient), and screen-time (low and high) on health related quality of life.

Results: In comparison to the reference category (sufficient physical activity and low screen-time) men and women who reported no physical activity and either high (OR = 4.52, 95% CI 2.82-7.25) or low (OR = 2.29, 95% CI 1.37-3.80) screen-time, were significantly more likely to report over 14 unhealthy days. Men reporting either; no physical activity and high (OR = 3.15, 95% CI 1.92-5.15), or low (OR = 2.17, 95% CI 1.30-3.63) screen-time; insufficient physical activity and high (OR = 1.68, 95% CI 1.08-2.60), or low (OR = 1.79, 95% CI 1.14-2.82) screen-time were more likely to rate their health as poor or fair. In women this was significant for those who reported no physical activity and high screen-time (OR = 1.98, 95% CI, 1.19-3.31).

Conclusions: Results suggest that the combination of no physical activity and high screen-time demonstrated the greatest negative impact on health related quality of life.
Keyword Physical activity
Quality of life
Sedentary behaviour
Adults
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 13 May 2012. This is a post-print copy of an article published in Preventive Medicine by Elsevier. Preventive Medicine is available online at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00917435

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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