Building co-management as a process: Problem solving through partnerships in Aboriginal country, Australia

Zurba, Melanie, Ross, Helen, Izurieta, Arturo, Rist, Philip, Bock, Ellie and Berkes, Fikret (2012) Building co-management as a process: Problem solving through partnerships in Aboriginal country, Australia. Environmental Management, 49 6: 1130-1142. doi:10.1007/s00267-012-9845-2


Author Zurba, Melanie
Ross, Helen
Izurieta, Arturo
Rist, Philip
Bock, Ellie
Berkes, Fikret
Title Building co-management as a process: Problem solving through partnerships in Aboriginal country, Australia
Journal name Environmental Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0364-152X
1432-1009
Publication date 2012-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00267-012-9845-2
Volume 49
Issue 6
Start page 1130
End page 1142
Total pages 13
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Collaborative problem solving has increasingly become important in the face of the complexities in the management of resources, including protected areas. The strategy undertaken by Girringun Aboriginal Corporation in north tropical Queensland, Australia, for developing co-management demonstrates the potential for a problem solving approach involving sequential initiatives, as an alternative to the more familiar negotiated agreements for co-management. Our longitudinal case study focuses on the development of indigenous ranger units as a strategic mechanism for the involvement of traditional owners in managing their country in collaboration with government and other interested parties. This was followed by Australia's first traditional use of marine resources agreement, and development of a multi-jurisdictional, land to sea, indigenous protected area. In using a relationship building approach to develop regional scale co-management, Girringun has been strengthening its capabilities as collaborator and regional service provider, thus, bringing customary decision-making structures into play to 'care for country'. From this evolving process we have identified the key components of a relationship building strategy, 'the pillars of co-management'. This approach includes learning-by-doing, the building of respect and rapport, sorting out responsibilities, practical engagement, and capacity-building.
Keyword Co-management
Partnerships
Capacity-building
Social learning
Indigenous lands
Protected areas
Institutions
Organizational development
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 4 April 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2013 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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