Detection of endogenous iron deposits in the injured mouse spinal cord through high-resolution ex vivo and in vivo MRI

Blomster, Linda V., Cowin, Gary J., Kurniawan, Nyoman D. and Ruitenberg, Marc J. (2013) Detection of endogenous iron deposits in the injured mouse spinal cord through high-resolution ex vivo and in vivo MRI. NMR in Biomedicine, 26 2: 141-150. doi:10.1002/nbm.2829

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Author Blomster, Linda V.
Cowin, Gary J.
Kurniawan, Nyoman D.
Ruitenberg, Marc J.
Title Detection of endogenous iron deposits in the injured mouse spinal cord through high-resolution ex vivo and in vivo MRI
Formatted title
Detection of endogenous iron deposits in the injured mouse spinal cord through high-resolution ex vivo and in vivo MRI
Journal name NMR in Biomedicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0952-3480
1099-1492
Publication date 2013-01-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/nbm.2829
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 26
Issue 2
Start page 141
End page 150
Total pages 10
Place of publication Bognor Regis, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The main aim of this study was to employ high-resolution MRI to investigate the spatiotemporal development of pathological features associated with contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in mice. Experimental mice were subjected to either sham surgery or moderate contusive SCI. A 16.4-T small-animal MR system was employed for nondestructive imaging of post-mortem, fixed spinal cord specimens at the subacute (7 days) and more chronic (28–35 days) stages post-injury. Routine histological techniques were used for subsequent investigation of the observed neuropathology at the microscopic level. The central core of the lesion appeared as a dark hypo-intense area on MR images at all time points investigated. Small focal hypo-intense spots were also observed spreading through the dorsal funiculi proximal and distal to the site of impact, an area that is known to undergo gliosis and Wallerian degeneration in response to injury. Histological examination revealed these hypo-intense spots to be high in iron content as determined by Prussian blue staining. Quantitative image analysis confirmed the increased presence of iron deposits at all post-injury time points investigated (p < 0.05). Distant iron deposits were also detectable through live imaging without the use of contrast-enhancing agents, enabling the longitudinal investigation of this pathology in individual animals. Further immunohistochemical evaluation showed that intracellular iron deposits localised to macrophages/microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in the subacute phase of SCI, but predominantly to glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive, CC-1-positive astrocytes at later stages of recovery. Progressive, widespread intracellular iron accumulation is thus a normal feature of SCI in mice, and high-resolution MRI can be effectively used to detect and monitor these neuropathological changes with time.
Keyword Neurotrauma
Secondary injury
Astrogliosis
Neural scar
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 23 JUN 2012

 
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Created: Sat, 30 Jun 2012, 01:48:32 EST by Bacsweet Kaur on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences