Population dynamics and ‘outbreaks’ of Diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, in Guangdong province, China: Climate or failure of management?

Li, Zhenyu, Zalucki, Myron P., Bao, Huali, Chen, Huanyu, Hu, Zhendi, Zhang, Deyong, Lin, Qingsheng, Yin, Fei, Wang, Min and Feng, Xia (2012) Population dynamics and ‘outbreaks’ of Diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, in Guangdong province, China: Climate or failure of management?. Journal of Economic Entomology, 105 3: 739-752. doi:10.1603/EC11384


Author Li, Zhenyu
Zalucki, Myron P.
Bao, Huali
Chen, Huanyu
Hu, Zhendi
Zhang, Deyong
Lin, Qingsheng
Yin, Fei
Wang, Min
Feng, Xia
Title Population dynamics and ‘outbreaks’ of Diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, in Guangdong province, China: Climate or failure of management?
Journal name Journal of Economic Entomology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0493
1938-291X
Publication date 2012-06-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1603/EC11384
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 105
Issue 3
Start page 739
End page 752
Total pages 14
Place of publication Lanham, MD, United States
Publisher Entomological Society of America
Language eng
Subject 2303 Ecology
1109 Insect Science
Abstract Diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), became the major pest of Brassica vegetable production in Guangdong, a province in southeastern China, in the late 1980s and has continued to challenge growers, particularly during the spring and autumn. Control has relied on insecticides and, as has happened in other parts of the world, resistance to these has evolved and subsequent field control failures have occurred. We review and summarize the history of diamondback moth management in Guangdong. We show that the geographic distribution of the pest in China is well described by a simple climate niche model. Our model predicts the seasonal phenology and some of the variation in abundance among years in Guangdong. Discrepancies may reflect migration and insecticide use at a landscape level. The scale of the pest problem experienced varies with management practices. Local production breaks, and strict post harvest hygiene are associated with lower pest pressure on large-scale production units. As more and more insecticides become ineffective the need to implement an insecticide resistance management strategy, as well as basic integrated pest management practices, will become more pressing. The potential use and development of a better forecasting system for diamondback moth that will assist these developments is outlined.
Formatted abstract
Diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), became the major pest of Brassica vegetable production in Guangdong, a province in southeastern China, in the late 1980s and has continued to challenge growers, particularly during the spring and autumn. Control has relied on insecticides and, as has happened in other parts of the world, resistance to these has evolved and subsequent field control failures have occurred. We review and summarize the history of diamondback moth management in Guangdong. We show that the geographic distribution of the pest in China is well described by a simple climate niche model. Our model predicts the seasonal phenology and some of the variation in abundance among years in Guangdong. Discrepancies may reflect migration and insecticide use at a landscape level. The scale of the pest problem experienced varies with management practices. Local production breaks, and strict post harvest hygiene are associated with lower pest pressure on large-scale production units. As more and more insecticides become ineffective the need to implement an insecticide resistance management strategy, as well as basic integrated pest management practices, will become more pressing. The potential use and development of a better forecasting system for diamondback moth that will assist these developments is outlined.
Keyword Bioclimatic modeling
Population outbreak
Plutella xylostella
Resistance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 201103021
10451064001006248
201012
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 26 Jun 2012, 23:52:51 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences