Establishment of an endangered species on a private nature refuge: What can we learn from reintroductions of the bridled nailtail wallaby Onychogalea fraenata?

Kingsley, Lisa, Goldizen, Anne and Fisher, Diana O. (2012) Establishment of an endangered species on a private nature refuge: What can we learn from reintroductions of the bridled nailtail wallaby Onychogalea fraenata?. Oryx, 46 2: 240-248. doi:10.1017/S0030605311000652


Author Kingsley, Lisa
Goldizen, Anne
Fisher, Diana O.
Title Establishment of an endangered species on a private nature refuge: What can we learn from reintroductions of the bridled nailtail wallaby Onychogalea fraenata?
Formatted title
Establishment of an endangered species on a private nature refuge: What can we learn from reintroductions of the bridled nailtail wallaby Onychogalea fraenata?
Journal name Oryx   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0030-6053
1365-3008
Publication date 2012-04-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0030605311000652
Volume 46
Issue 2
Start page 240
End page 248
Total pages 9
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Translocation and reintroduction are used to reduce extinction risk associated with a small population and range size in threatened mammal species. We evaluated the outcome of a reintroduction of the bridled nailtail wallaby Onychogalea fraenata to Avocet Nature Refuge, a private refuge in central Queensland, Australia. This macropod was also reintroduced to Idalia National Park in western Queensland in 1996 and occurs in one natural population in central Queensland. We estimated population growth, adult and juvenile survival, and distribution changes since the last release of O. fraenata to Avocet in 2005, and evaluated female reproductive success and health. Although animals were in good condition, population size was a tenth of that of the 1996 Idalia reintroduction reported after 3 years and, unlike at Idalia, juvenile survival at Avocet was low. The likely causes are consistent with predictors of translocation and reintroduction failures in mammals. These are predation, the small number of individuals in each release, the likely suboptimal health status of reintroduced individuals, drought, and possibly lack of dispersal from the small area of preferred habitat. The lessons of this reintroduction are that future attempts are likely to have the best chance of success if they occur in non-drought years, at sites with large, non-fragmented areas of brigalow forest, involve the release of large groups of animals together, and are accompanied by intensive, long-term baiting to control introduced predators.
Keyword Australia
Avocet Nature Refuge
Bridled nailtail wallaby
Ex situ conservation
Macropodidae
Onychogalea fraenata
Reintroduction
Translocation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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