Anxiety and depressive disorders are associated with delusional-like experiences: a replication study based on a National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing

Saha, Sukanta, Scott, James, Varghese, Daniel and McGrath, John (2012) Anxiety and depressive disorders are associated with delusional-like experiences: a replication study based on a National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing. BMJ Open, 2 3: e001001.1-e001001.7. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001001


Author Saha, Sukanta
Scott, James
Varghese, Daniel
McGrath, John
Title Anxiety and depressive disorders are associated with delusional-like experiences: a replication study based on a National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal name BMJ Open   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2044-6055
Publication date 2012-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001001
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 2
Issue 3
Start page e001001.1
End page e001001.7
Total pages 7
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BMJ Group
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives There is growing evidence that delusional-like experiences (DLE) are associated with common mental disorders. In particular, a National Mental Health Survey conducted in Australia during 2007 reported an association between DLE and both anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder (MDD). However, the previous study did not examine this association with respect to subtypes of anxiety disorder nor with severity of MDD. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between DLE and both anxiety disorder and MDD in more detail based on an independent population sample.

Design Cross-sectional study.

Setting Subjects were drawn from the Australian Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing 1997 using a stratified multistage area sampling of persons living in private dwellings in all States and Territories of Australia.

Participants Approximately 13 600 private dwellings were initially selected with one person aged 18 years or older from each dwelling invited to participate. In total, 10 641 individuals participated in the survey.

Primary and secondary outcome measures The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to identify individuals with DLE and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder, Fourth Edition (DSM IV) lifetime diagnoses of anxiety disorders and MDD. The influence of various anxiety disorders and MDD on DLE was assessed with logistic regression.

Results Having a lifetime diagnosis of either any anxiety disorder or MDD was significantly associated with the endorsement of DLE. The association was found for each of the main anxiety disorders when examined separately. There was a dose–response relationship between increasing severity of MDD and higher odds of DLE endorsement.

Conclusions DLE are associated with a wide range of anxiety disorders and are more prevalent in those with MDD. Understanding the relationship between DLE, anxiety disorders and depression may provide insights into shared pathways that underpin both psychotic disorders and common mental disorders.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article # e001001

 
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Created: Sat, 02 Jun 2012, 02:17:24 EST by James Scott on behalf of Psychiatry - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital