Coaction of stress and serotonin transporter genotype in predicting aggression at the transition to adulthood

Conway, Christopher C., Keenan-Miller, Danielle, Hammen, Constance, Lind, Penelope A., Najman, Jake M. and Brennan, Patricia A. (2012) Coaction of stress and serotonin transporter genotype in predicting aggression at the transition to adulthood. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 41 1: 53-63. doi:10.1080/15374416.2012.632351


Author Conway, Christopher C.
Keenan-Miller, Danielle
Hammen, Constance
Lind, Penelope A.
Najman, Jake M.
Brennan, Patricia A.
Title Coaction of stress and serotonin transporter genotype in predicting aggression at the transition to adulthood
Journal name Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1537-4416
1537-4424
Publication date 2012-01-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/15374416.2012.632351
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 41
Issue 1
Start page 53
End page 63
Total pages 11
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Abstract Despite consistent evidence that serotonin functioning affects stress reactivity and vulnerability to aggression, research on serotonin gene-stress interactions (G × E) in the development of aggression remains limited. The present study investigated variation in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) as a moderator of the stress-aggression association at the transition to adulthood. Multiple informants and multiple measures were used to assess aggression in a cohort of 381 Australian youth (61% female, 93% Caucasian) interviewed at ages 15 and 20. At age 20, semistructured interviews assessed acute and chronic stressors occurring in the past 12 months. Structural equation modeling analyses revealed a significant main effect of chronic stress, but not 5-HTTLPR or acute stress, on increases in aggression at age 20. Consistent with G × E hypotheses, 5-HTTLPR short allele carriers demonstrated greater increments in aggression following chronic stress relative to long allele homozygotes. The strength of chronic stress G × E did not vary according to sex. Variation at 5-HTTLPR appears to contribute to individual differences in aggressive reactions to chronic stress at the transition to adulthood.
Keyword Gene-Environment Interaction
Life Events
Promoter Polymorphism
5-Httlpr Polymorphism
Childhood Adversity
Depression
Children
Anxiety
Maltreatment
Metaanalysis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID T32 HG002536
R01 MH052239-10
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online: 10 January 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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