Effect of mobile phone-based psychotherapy in suicide prevention: A randomized controlled trial in Sri Lanka

Marasinghe, Rohana B., Edirippulige, Sisira, Kavanagh, David, Smith, Anthony and Jiffry, Mohamad T. M. (2012) Effect of mobile phone-based psychotherapy in suicide prevention: A randomized controlled trial in Sri Lanka. Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, 18 3: 151-155. doi:10.1258/jtt.2012.SFT107


Author Marasinghe, Rohana B.
Edirippulige, Sisira
Kavanagh, David
Smith, Anthony
Jiffry, Mohamad T. M.
Title Effect of mobile phone-based psychotherapy in suicide prevention: A randomized controlled trial in Sri Lanka
Journal name Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1357-633X
1758-1109
Publication date 2012-04-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1258/jtt.2012.SFT107
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 18
Issue 3
Start page 151
End page 155
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Royal Society of Medicine Press
Language eng
Abstract We conducted a randomized controlled trial to test whether a Brief Mobile Treatment (BMT) intervention could improve outcomes relative to usual care among suicide attempters. The intervention included training in problem solving therapy, meditation, a brief intervention to increase social support as well as advice on alcohol and other drugs, and mobile phone follow-up. The effect of the intervention was measured in terms of a reduction in suicidal ideation, depression and self-harm at Baseline, six and 12 months. A wait-list control group received usual care. A total of 68 participants was recruited from a Sri Lankan hospital following a suicide attempt. Participants who received the intervention were found to achieve significant improvements in reducing suicidal ideation and depression than those receiving usual care. The BMT group also experienced a significant improvement of social support when compared to the control group. However, the BMT group did not demonstrate a significant effect in reducing actual self-harm and most substance use, and differential effects on alcohol use were restricted to men. Although the present study was limited in revealing which component of the intervention was more effective in preventing suicide, it showed its efficacy in reducing suicide as a whole.
Keyword Health Care Sciences & Services
Health Care Sciences & Services
HEALTH CARE SCIENCES & SERVICES
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 22 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 22 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 24 Apr 2012, 21:51:36 EST by Burke, Eliza on behalf of Centre for On-Line Health