A tale of two cities. Climate change policies in Vancouver and Melbourne: barometers of cooperative federalism?

Jones, Stephen (2012) A tale of two cities. Climate change policies in Vancouver and Melbourne: barometers of cooperative federalism?. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 36 6: 1242-1267. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2427.2011.01083.x

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Author Jones, Stephen
Title A tale of two cities. Climate change policies in Vancouver and Melbourne: barometers of cooperative federalism?
Journal name International Journal of Urban and Regional Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0309-1317
1468-2427
Publication date 2012-01-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1468-2427.2011.01083.x
Volume 36
Issue 6
Start page 1242
End page 1267
Total pages 26
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The failure of the United Nations negotiations on climate change in Copenhagen presents governments with an opportunity to consider new approaches to implementing climate change policy. Developed nations like Canada and Australia continue to fall short of their commitments to Kyoto targets and predict that their greenhouse gas emissions will continue to rise. The planning and development of metropolitan areas continues to promote high levels of consumption and increased dependence on fossil fuel-based energy. City governments in Vancouver and Melbourne have strong commitments to both mitigation and adaptation policy action against the impact of global warming. Both argue they are constrained in their efforts by federal institutional arrangements and require improved cooperation from other levels of government. This article uses the conceptual framework developed by the OECD to support greater levels of cooperation between governments in multilevel systems when implementing climate change policies. The article examines the contextual factors inherent in the institutional arrangements and uses the experiences of Vancouver and Melbourne to explore the factors that encourage or discourage cooperation in climate change policy.
Keyword Climate change
City government
Intergovernmental cooperation
Australia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 3 January 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 04 Apr 2012, 20:02:51 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School