Biodiversity–productivity relationships in small-scale mixed-species plantations using native species in Leyte province, Philippines

Nguyen, Huong, Herbohn, John, Firn, Jennifer and Lamb, David (2012) Biodiversity–productivity relationships in small-scale mixed-species plantations using native species in Leyte province, Philippines. Forest Ecology and Management, 274 81-90. doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2012.02.022


Author Nguyen, Huong
Herbohn, John
Firn, Jennifer
Lamb, David
Title Biodiversity–productivity relationships in small-scale mixed-species plantations using native species in Leyte province, Philippines
Journal name Forest Ecology and Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0378-1127
1872-7042
Publication date 2012-06-15
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.foreco.2012.02.022
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 274
Start page 81
End page 90
Total pages 10
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract In this study, we investigate the relationship between tree species diversity and production in 18 mixed-species plantations established under the Rainforestation Farming system in Leyte province, the Philippines. The aim was to quantify productivity in the mixed-species plantations in comparison to the monocultures, and identify key drivers of productivity including environmental conditions, stand structural characteristics and surrogate measures of biodiversity, i.e. species richness, Shannon’s diversity index and functional groups. We found that monocultures had a much higher productivity than mixtures of the same and other species. In the mixtures, biodiversity and productivity did not have a simple relationship. Instead the proportion of exotic and native species, and the proportion of fast-growing species had a marginally significant positive effect on stand productivity, but no significant relationship was found with species richness or Shannon’s diversity. Instead stand structural characteristics such as density and age were the strongest drivers of increased productivity. Production levels within the mixed-species plantations varied significantly between sites. Overall, we found that the productivity of mixed species plantations was driven more by the characteristics of species present and stand structural characteristics then by simply the number and abundance of species, which suggests management practices are key for balancing multiple objectives to meet sustainable development needs.
Keyword Species richness
Shannon’s index
Functional species
Native species
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID ASEM/2003/052
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation Publications
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2013 Collection
 
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Created: Mon, 02 Apr 2012, 20:23:11 EST by Dr John Herbohn on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences