The immediate effects of foot orthoses on functional performance in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome

Barton, C. J., Menz, H. B. and Crossley, K. M. (2011) The immediate effects of foot orthoses on functional performance in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 45 3: 193-197. doi:10.1136/bjsm.2009.069203


Author Barton, C. J.
Menz, H. B.
Crossley, K. M.
Title The immediate effects of foot orthoses on functional performance in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome
Journal name British Journal of Sports Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0306-3674
1473-0480
Publication date 2011-03-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bjsm.2009.069203
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 45
Issue 3
Start page 193
End page 197
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher BMJ Group
Language eng
Abstract The purpose of the study was to determine whether prefabricated foot orthoses immediately reduce pain during functional tasks in people with patellofemoral osteoarthritis, compared to flat insoles and shoes alone.
Formatted abstract
Objective Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) often results in reduced functional performance. There is growing evidence for the use of foot orthoses to treat
this multifactorial condition. In this study, the immediate effects of foot orthoses on functional performance and the association of foot posture and footwear with
improvements in function were evaluated.
Methods Fifty-two individuals with PFPS (18–35 years) were prescribed prefabricated foot orthoses (Vasyli Pro; Vasyli International, Labrador, Australia).  Functional outcome measures evaluated included the change in (1) pain and (2) ease of a single-leg squat on a fi ve-point Likert scale, and change in the number of (3) pain-free step downs and (4) single-leg rises from sitting. The association of foot posture using the Foot Posture Index, navicular drop and calcaneal angle relative
to subtalar joint neutral; and the footwear motion control properties scale score with improved function were evaluated using Spearman’s ρ statistics.
Results Prefabricated foot orthoses produced signifi cant improvements (p<0.05) for all functional outcome measures. A more pronated foot type and poorer footwear motion control properties were found to be associated with reduced pain during the
single-leg squat and improvements in the number of pain-free single-leg rises from sitting when wearing foot orthoses. In addition, a more pronated foot type was also found to be associated with improved ease of completing a single-leg squat when wearing foot orthoses.
Conclusion Prefabricated foot orthoses provide immediate improvements in functional performance, and these improvements are associated with a more
pronated foot type and poorer footwear motion control properties.
Keyword Foot orthoses
Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome
Functional performance
Knee Pain
Insoles
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 433049
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Published Online First 20 July 2010

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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