Preparing for 'Schoolies': A pilot focus study investigating the role of parents, media and others

Li, Hy Karen and White, Angela (2011). Preparing for 'Schoolies': A pilot focus study investigating the role of parents, media and others. In: Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2011, Hobart, Australia, (54-54). 13-16 November, 2011. doi:10.1111/j.1465-3362.2011.00355.x


Author Li, Hy Karen
White, Angela
Title of paper Preparing for 'Schoolies': A pilot focus study investigating the role of parents, media and others
Conference name Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2011
Conference location Hobart, Australia
Conference dates 13-16 November, 2011
Journal name Drug and Alcohol Review   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2011.00355.x
ISSN 0959-5236
1465-3362
Volume 30
Issue Supplement 1
Start page 54
End page 54
Total pages 1
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Introduction and Aims: Each November, thousands of young people congregate across Australia to celebrate fi nishing high school. ‘Schoolies’ is a weeklong event considered by some a ‘rite of passage’ and by others a ‘boozy party’ marked by high-risk alcohol and drug use, unsafe sex and violence. Little research has been conducted investigating young peoples’ expectations, perceptions and experiences
of Schoolies.
Design and Methods: Five 1-hour focus groups were conducted with 28 (75% female) 18–24 year olds. Using grounded theory, transcripts were analysed and themes and narratives concerning Schoolies identified.
Results: Many participants reported initial parental conflict and resistance about Schoolies. As the event approached, parents adopted strategies including warning of the risks, providing in-house alcohol and scheduling regular check-in phone calls. Schools also attempted to address the risks by arranging school-based briefings by the police and other agencies. Overall, participants reported that Schoolies was not as enjoyable, exciting or as dangerous as they expected and was essentially spent
drinking alcohol with friends and being bored. Regarding keeping safe at Schoolies, participants said that looking after their mates and avoiding high-risk situations were the main strategies employed.
Discussion and Conclusions: This qualitative study revealed that young people perceive Schoolies to be a weeklong fun-filled celebration but that it often fell short of what is experienced. These findings and their implications for planning and managing Schoolies at an individual, family and community level will be discussed.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 22 Mar 2012, 01:10:03 EST by Ms Dayna Smith on behalf of Centre for Youth Substance Abuse