Prevalence and determinants of frequent gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in the Australian community

Pandeya, N., Green, A. C., Whiteman, D. C. and for the Australian Cancer Study (2012) Prevalence and determinants of frequent gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in the Australian community. Diseases of the Esophagus, 25 7: 573-583. doi:10.1111/j.1442-2050.2011.01287.x

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Author Pandeya, N.
Green, A. C.
Whiteman, D. C.
for the Australian Cancer Study
Title Prevalence and determinants of frequent gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in the Australian community
Journal name Diseases of the Esophagus   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1120-8694
1442-2050
Publication date 2012-09-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1442-2050.2011.01287.x
Open Access Status
Volume 25
Issue 7
Start page 573
End page 583
Total pages 11
Place of publication Richmond, Vic., Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Frequent gastroesophageal reflux (GER) causes chronic inflammation and damages esophageal mucosa, which can lead to Barrett’s esophagus. It has also been consistently found to be a strong risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma. The prevalence of GER appears to vary; however, population-based Australian studies investigating the symptoms are limited. This study aimed to estimate the population prevalence and identify the determinants of frequent GER symptoms in the Australian population. Self-reported information on the frequency of reflux symptoms were collected from 1,580 adults from a population register. We estimated age-and
sex-standardized prevalence of occasional (<weekly) and frequent (≥weekly) GER symptoms in the Australian population. We also estimated adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) for GER symptoms associated with demographic and lifestyle characteristics. The standardized prevalences of GER symptoms were 10.4% and 38.3% for frequent and occasional symptoms, respectively. Compared with participants with body mass index <25, those with body mass index ≥35 had almost 90% higher prevalence of frequent GER symptoms (PR 1.89; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13–3.16). Similarly, the prevalence of frequent GER symptoms was significantly higher among regular users of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs than never users (PR 1.71; 95%CI 1.08–3.16) and regular consumers of medium to well-done barbecued meat (PR 1.75; 95%CI 1.10–2.80) or fried food (PR 2.69; 95%CI 1.66–4.35). The prevalence of frequent GER symptoms was significantly lowered with regular physical activity (PR 0.46; 95%CI 0.32–0.66) and Helicobacter pylori infection (PR 0.53; 95%CI 0.35–0.80). We found no evidence that frequent GER symptoms were associated with smoking, alcohol, spicy food, or coffee consumption. Our results confirm that GER symptoms are common and that frequent GER symptoms are associated with a range of modifiable lifestyle factors.
Keyword Body mass index
Cross-sectional survey
Gastroesophageal reflux
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 30 November 2011.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 20 Mar 2012, 23:38:15 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health