Validity of conducting clinical dysphagia assessments for patients with normal to mild cognitive impairment via telerehabilitation

Ward, Elizabeth C., Sharma, Shobha, Burns, Clare, Theodoros, Deborah and Russell, Trevor (2012) Validity of conducting clinical dysphagia assessments for patients with normal to mild cognitive impairment via telerehabilitation. Dysphagia, 27 4: 460-472. doi:10.1007/s00455-011-9390-9

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Author Ward, Elizabeth C.
Sharma, Shobha
Burns, Clare
Theodoros, Deborah
Russell, Trevor
Title Validity of conducting clinical dysphagia assessments for patients with normal to mild cognitive impairment via telerehabilitation
Journal name Dysphagia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0179-051X
1432-0460
Publication date 2012-12-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00455-011-9390-9
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 27
Issue 4
Start page 460
End page 472
Total pages 13
Place of publication New York, NY, U.S.A.
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract To assess the validity of conducting clinical dysphagia assessments via telerehabilitation, 40 individuals with dysphagia from various etiologies were assessed simultaneously by a face-to-face speech-language pathologist (FTF-SLP) and a telerehabilitation SLP (T-SLP) via an Internet-based videoconferencing telerehabilitation system. Dysphagia status was assessed using a Clinical Swallowing Examination (CSE) protocol, delivered via a specialized telerehabilitation videoconferencing system and involving the use of an assistant at the patient's end of the consultation to facilitate the assessment. Levels of agreement between the FTF-SLP and T-SLP revealed that the majority of parameters reached set levels of clinically acceptable levels of agreement. Specifically, agreement between the T-SLP and FTF-SLP ratings for the oral, oromotor, and laryngeal function tasks revealed levels of exact agreement ranging from 75 to 100% (kappa = 0.36-1.0), while the parameters relating to food and fluid trials ranged in exact agreement from 79 to 100% (kappa = 0.61-1.0). Across the parameters related to aspiration risk and clinical management, exact agreement ranged between 79 and 100% (kappa = 0.49-1.0). The data show that a CSE conducted via telerehabilitation can provide valid and reliable outcomes comparable to clinical decisions made in the FTF environment.
Formatted abstract
To assess the validity of conducting clinical dysphagia assessments via telerehabilitation, 40 individuals with dysphagia from various etiologies were assessed simultaneously by a face-to-face speech-language pathologist (FTF-SLP) and a telerehabilitation SLP (T-SLP) via an Internet-based videoconferencing telerehabilitation system. Dysphagia status was assessed using a Clinical Swallowing Examination (CSE) protocol, delivered via a specialized telerehabilitation videoconferencing system and involving the use of an assistant at the patient’s end of the consultation to facilitate the assessment. Levels of agreement between the FTF-SLP and T-SLP revealed that the majority of parameters reached set levels of clinically acceptable levels of agreement. Specifically, agreement between the T-SLP and FTF-SLP ratings for the oral, oromotor, and laryngeal function tasks revealed levels of exact agreement ranging from 75 to 100% (kappa = 0.36–1.0), while the parameters relating to food and fluid trials ranged in exact agreement from 79 to 100% (kappa = 0.61–1.0). Across the parameters related to aspiration risk and clinical management, exact agreement ranged between 79 and 100% (kappa = 0.49–1.0). The data show that a CSE conducted via telerehabilitation can provide valid and reliable outcomes comparable to clinical decisions made in the FTF environment.
Keyword Deglutition
Deglutition disorders
Telerehabilitation
Dysphagia
Swallowing disorders
Aspiration
Clinical swallowing examination
Videoconferencing
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 16 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 19 Mar 2012, 08:29:14 EST by Professor Deborah Theodoros on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences