Subretinal transplantation of genetically modified human cell lines attenuates loss of visual function in dystrophic rats

Lund, RD, Adamson, P, Sauve, Y, Keegan, DJ, Girman, SV, Wang, SM, Winton, H, Kanuga, N, Kwan, ASL, Beauchene, L, Zerbib, A, Hetherington, L, Couraud, PO, Coffey, P and Greenwood, J (2001) Subretinal transplantation of genetically modified human cell lines attenuates loss of visual function in dystrophic rats. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 98 17: 9942-9947. doi:10.1073/pnas.171266298


Author Lund, RD
Adamson, P
Sauve, Y
Keegan, DJ
Girman, SV
Wang, SM
Winton, H
Kanuga, N
Kwan, ASL
Beauchene, L
Zerbib, A
Hetherington, L
Couraud, PO
Coffey, P
Greenwood, J
Title Subretinal transplantation of genetically modified human cell lines attenuates loss of visual function in dystrophic rats
Journal name Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0027-8424
Publication date 2001-08-01
Year available 2001
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1073/pnas.171266298
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 98
Issue 17
Start page 9942
End page 9947
Total pages 6
Place of publication WASHINGTON
Publisher NATL ACAD SCIENCES
Language eng
Abstract Royal College of Surgeons rats are genetically predisposed to undergo significant visual loss caused by a primary dysfunction of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. By using this model, we have examined the efficacy of subretinal transplantation of two independent human RIPE cell lines each exhibiting genetic modifications that confer long-term stability in vitro. The two cell lines, a spontaneously derived cell line (ARPE19) and an extensively characterized genetically engineered human RIPE cell line (h1RPE7), which expresses SV40 large T (tumor) antigen, were evaluated separately. Both lines result in a significant preservation of visual function as assessed by either behavioral or physiological techniques. This attenuation of visual loss correlates with photoreceptor survival and the presence of donor cells in the areas of rescued photoreceptors at 5 months postgrafting (6 months of age). These results demonstrate the potential of genetically modified human RPE cells for ultimate application in therapeutic transplantation strategies for retinal degenerative diseases caused by RIPE dysfunction.
Keyword Retinal-Pigment Epithelium
Rcs Rat
Royal-College
Macular Degeneration
Superior Colliculus
Surgeons Rats
Rpe
Atrophy
Grafts
Rescue
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: ResearcherID Downloads - Archived
 
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