Social and emotional competence in traumatic brain injury: New and established assessment tools

Hynes, Catherine A., Stone, Valerie E. and Kelso, Louise A. (2011) Social and emotional competence in traumatic brain injury: New and established assessment tools. Social Neuroscience, 6 5-6: 599-614. doi:10.1080/17470919.2011.584447


Author Hynes, Catherine A.
Stone, Valerie E.
Kelso, Louise A.
Title Social and emotional competence in traumatic brain injury: New and established assessment tools
Journal name Social Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1747-0919
1747-0927
Publication date 2011-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/17470919.2011.584447
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 6
Issue 5-6
Start page 599
End page 614
Total pages 16
Place of publication Hove, United Kingdom
Publisher Psychology Press
Language eng
Subject 3207 Social Psychology
3303 Development
2802 Behavioral Neuroscience
Abstract Chronic social/emotional deficits are common in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), leading to significant functional difficulties. Objective, quantitative tools for assessing social/emotional competence are an important adjunct to cognitive assessments. We review existing social/emotional measures, conclude that theory of mind tests are not adequate for clinical assessments of social competence, and explain the development and piloting of novel measures in a small group of moderate to severe TBI patients (N = 16) and non-brain-damaged controls (N = 16). The novel measures are the Global Interpersonal Skills Test (GIST), a questionnaire measuring informant-rated social skills; the Assessment of Social Context (ASC), a video-based task examining understanding of others' emotions, attitudes, and intentions; the Social Interpretations Test, a social framing task based on Heider and Simmel (1944); and Awareness of Interoception, a heartbeat-detection paradigm related to physiological self-awareness. In a MANOVA, other-rated social skills (GIST), ASC, and Awareness of Interoception scores were significantly lower for TBI patients than controls. ASC, r(31)=.655, and Social Interpretations, r(31)=.460, scores were significantly correlated with informant-rated social skills (GIST). We encourage clinicians to add social/emotional measures to assessments of TBI patients.
Formatted abstract
Chronic social/emotional deficits are common in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), leading to significant functional difficulties. Objective, quantitative tools for assessing social/emotional competence are an important adjunct to cognitive assessments.We review existing social/emotional measures, conclude that theory of mind tests are not adequate for clinical assessments of social competence, and explain the development and piloting of novel measures in a small group of moderate to severe TBI patients (N =16) and non-brain-damaged controls (N =16). The novel measures are the Global Interpersonal Skills Test (GIST), a questionnaire measuring informant-rated social skills; the Assessment of Social Context (ASC), a video-based task examining understanding of others’ emotions, attitudes, and intentions; the Social Interpretations Test, a social framing task based on Heider and Simmel (1944); and Awareness of Interoception, a heartbeat-detection paradigm related to physiological self-awareness. In a MANOVA, other-rated social skills (GIST), ASC, and Awareness of Interoception scores were significantly lower for TBI patients than controls. ASC, r(31)=.655, and Social Interpretations, r(31)=.460, scores were significantly correlated with informant-rated social skills (GIST). We encourage clinicians to add social/emotional measures to assessments of TBI patients.
Keyword Traumatic brain injury
Social skills
Emotions
Head injury
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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