What people with aphasia want: Their goals according to the ICF

Worrall, Linda, Sherratt, Sue, Rogers, Penny, Howe, Tami, Hersh, Deborah, Ferguson, Alison and Davidson, Bronwyn (2011) What people with aphasia want: Their goals according to the ICF. Aphasiology, 25 3: 309-322. doi:10.1080/02687038.2010.508530


Author Worrall, Linda
Sherratt, Sue
Rogers, Penny
Howe, Tami
Hersh, Deborah
Ferguson, Alison
Davidson, Bronwyn
Title What people with aphasia want: Their goals according to the ICF
Journal name Aphasiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0268-7038
1464-5041
Publication date 2011-01-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02687038.2010.508530
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 25
Issue 3
Start page 309
End page 322
Total pages 14
Place of publication Sussex, England, U.K.
Publisher Psychology Press
Language eng
Abstract Background: The goals of people with aphasia should guide service delivery. Services are increasingly influenced by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) (WHO, 2001), but little is yet known about whether the goals of people with aphasia span the full spectrum of the ICF. Aims: The purpose of this study was to describe the goals of people with aphasia and to code the goals according to the ICF. Methods Procedures: A qualitative descriptive research approach was used involving semi-structured in-depth interviews with 50 participants with aphasia post-stroke. Interviews were videotaped and transcribed verbatim and then analysed using qualitative content analysis. The goals of a 30% consecutive subsample were then coded using the ICF. Outcomes Results: Nine broad categories of goals were identified. Participants with aphasia wanted to return to their pre-stroke life and to communicate not only their basic needs but also their opinions. They also wanted information about aphasia, stroke, and available services; more speech therapy; greater autonomy; and dignity and respect. They identified the importance of engagement in social, leisure, and work activities as well as regaining their physical health. Interestingly, their goals included wanting to help others. Goals could be linked to all ICF components within the ICF, with the majority linked to Activities and Participation, followed by Environmental Factors, Body Functions and Structures, and Personal Factors. Conclusions: People with aphasia in this study were able to articulate a wide range of goals post-stroke that encompassed all of the ICF components but had a particular focus on the Activity and Participation components.
Formatted abstract
Background: The goals of people with aphasia should guide service delivery. Services are increasingly influenced by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) (WHO, 2001), but little is yet known about whether the goals of people with aphasia span the full spectrum of the ICF.

Aims: The purpose of this study was to describe the goals of people with aphasia and to code the goals according to the ICF.

Methods & Procedures: A qualitative descriptive research approach was used involving semi-structured in-depth interviews with 50 participants with aphasia post-stroke. Interviews were videotaped and transcribed verbatim and then analysed using qualitative content analysis. The goals of a 30% consecutive subsample were then coded using the ICF.

Outcomes & Results:
Nine broad categories of goals were identified. Participants with aphasia wanted to return to their pre-stroke life and to communicate not only their basic needs but also their opinions. They also wanted information about aphasia, stroke, and available services; more speech therapy; greater autonomy; and dignity and respect. They identified the importance of engagement in social, leisure, and work activities as well as regaining their physical health. Interestingly, their goals included wanting to help others. Goals could be linked to all ICF components within the ICF, with the majority linked to Activities and Participation, followed by Environmental Factors, Body Functions and Structures, and Personal Factors.

Conclusions: People with aphasia in this study were able to articulate a wide range of goals post-stroke that encompassed all of the ICF components but had a particular focus on the Activity and Participation components.
Keyword Aphasia
Goals
Qualitative research
Health services needs and demand
Rehabilitation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 401532
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 20 Feb 2012, 23:58:49 EST by Professor Linda Worrall on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences