Different attentional blink tasks reflect distinct information processing limitations: An individual differences approach

Kelly, Ashleigh J. and Dux, Paul E. (2011) Different attentional blink tasks reflect distinct information processing limitations: An individual differences approach. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 37 6: 1867-1873. doi:10.1037/a0025975


Author Kelly, Ashleigh J.
Dux, Paul E.
Title Different attentional blink tasks reflect distinct information processing limitations: An individual differences approach
Journal name Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0096-1523
1939-1277
Publication date 2011-12-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0025975
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 37
Issue 6
Start page 1867
End page 1873
Total pages 7
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Language eng
Abstract To study the temporal dynamics and capacity-limits of attentional selection and encoding, researchers often employ the attentional blink (AB) phenomenon: subjects' impaired ability to report the second of two targets in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream that appear within 200–500 ms of one another. The AB has now been the subject of hundreds of scientific investigations, and a variety of different dual-target RSVP paradigms have been employed to study this failure of consciousness. The three most common are those where targets are defined categorically from distractors; those where target definition is based on featural information; and those where there is a set switch between T1 and T2, with the first target typically being featurally defined and T2 requiring a detection or discrimination judgment (probe task). An almost universally held assumption across all AB theories is that these three tasks measure the same deficit; however here, using an individual differences approach, we demonstrate that AB magnitude is only related across categorical and featural tasks. Thus, these paradigms appear to reflect a distinct cognitive limitation from that observed under set-switch conditions.
Keyword Attentional blink
Individual differences
Independent bottlenecks
Consciousness
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DP0986387
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 13 Feb 2012, 22:35:02 EST by Dr Paul Dux on behalf of School of Psychology