A review of the pharmacobiotic regulation of gastrointestinal inflammation by probiotics, commensal bacteria and prebiotics

Vitetta, L, Briskey, D., Hayes, E., Shing, C. and Peake, J. (2012) A review of the pharmacobiotic regulation of gastrointestinal inflammation by probiotics, commensal bacteria and prebiotics. Inflammopharmacology, 20 5: 251-266. doi:10.1007/s10787-012-0126-8

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Author Vitetta, L
Briskey, D.
Hayes, E.
Shing, C.
Peake, J.
Title A review of the pharmacobiotic regulation of gastrointestinal inflammation by probiotics, commensal bacteria and prebiotics
Journal name Inflammopharmacology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0925-4692
1568-5608
Publication date 2012-04-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1007/s10787-012-0126-8
Open Access Status
Volume 20
Issue 5
Start page 251
End page 266
Total pages 16
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher Birkhaeuser Verlag
Language eng
Abstract The idea that microbes induce disease has steered medical research toward the discovery of antibacterial products for the prevention and treatment of microbial infections. The twentieth century saw increasing dependency on antimicrobials as mainline therapy accentuating the notion that bacterial interactions with humans were to be avoided or desirably controlled. The last two decades, though, have seen a refocusing of thinking and research effort directed towards elucidating the critical inter-relationships between the gut microbiome and its host that control health/wellness or disease. This research has redefined the interactions between gut microbes and vertebrates, now recognizing that the microbial active cohort and its mammalian host have shared co-evolutionary metabolic interactions that span millennia. Microbial interactions in the gastrointestinal tract provide the necessary cues for the development of regulated pro- and anti-inflammatory signals that promotes immunological tolerance, metabolic regulation and other factors which may then control local and extra-intestinal inflammation. Pharmacobiotics, using nutritional and functional food additives to regulate the gut microbiome, will be an exciting growth area of therapeutics, developing alongside an increased scientific understanding of gut-microbiome symbiosis in health and disease.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 18 March 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 09 Feb 2012, 20:38:29 EST by Dr Luis Vitetta on behalf of Medicine - Princess Alexandra Hospital