The emerging NDM carbapenemases

Nordmann, Patrice, Poirel, Laurent, Walsh, Timothy R. and Livermore, David M. (2011) The emerging NDM carbapenemases. Trends in Microbiology, 19 12: 588-595. doi:10.1016/j.tim.2011.09.005


Author Nordmann, Patrice
Poirel, Laurent
Walsh, Timothy R.
Livermore, David M.
Title The emerging NDM carbapenemases
Journal name Trends in Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0966-842X
1878-4380
Publication date 2011-11-15
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.tim.2011.09.005
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 19
Issue 12
Start page 588
End page 595
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 2404 Microbiology
2726 Microbiology (medical)
2725 Infectious Diseases
2406 Virology
Abstract Carbapenems were the last β-lactams retaining near-universal anti-Gram-negative activity, but carbapenemases are spreading, conferring resistance. New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM) enzymes are the latest carbapenemases to be recognized and since 2008 have been reported worldwide, mostly in bacteria from patients epidemiologically linked to the Indian subcontinent, where they occur widely in hospital and community infections, and also in contaminated urban water. The main type is NDM-1, but minor variants occur. NDM enzymes are present largely in Enterobacteriaceae, but also in non-fermenters and Vibrionaceae. Dissemination predominantly involves transfer of the bla gene among promiscuous plasmids and clonal outbreaks. Bacteria with NDM-1 are typically resistant to nearly all antibiotics, and reliable detection and surveillance are crucial.
Formatted abstract
Carbapenems were the last β-lactams retaining nearuniversal anti-Gram-negative activity, but carbapenemases are spreading, conferring resistance. New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM) enzymes are the latest carbapenemases to be recognized and since 2008 have been reported worldwide, mostly in bacteria from patients epidemiologically linked to the Indian subcontinent, where they occur widely in hospital and community infections, and also in contaminated urban water. The main type is NDM-1, but minor variants occur. NDM enzymes are present largely in Enterobacteriaceae, but also in non-fermenters and Vibrionaceae. Dissemination predominantly involves transfer of the blaNDM-1 gene among promiscuous plasmids and clonal outbreaks. Bacteria with NDM-1 are typically resistant to nearly all antibiotics, and reliable detection and surveillance are crucial. 
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2012 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 279 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 31 Jan 2012, 19:04:16 EST by Roheen Gill on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research