Attentional bias for threat in older adults: Moderation of the positivity bias by trait anxiety and stimulus modality

Lee, Lewina O. and Knight, Bob G. (2009) Attentional bias for threat in older adults: Moderation of the positivity bias by trait anxiety and stimulus modality. Psychology and Aging, 24 3: 741-747. doi:10.1037/a0016409


Author Lee, Lewina O.
Knight, Bob G.
Title Attentional bias for threat in older adults: Moderation of the positivity bias by trait anxiety and stimulus modality
Journal name Psychology and Aging   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0882-7974
1939-1498
Publication date 2009-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0016409
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 24
Issue 3
Start page 741
End page 747
Total pages 7
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Language eng
Abstract Socioemotional selectivity theory suggests that emotion regulation goals motivate older adults to preferentially allocate attention to positive stimuli and away from negative stimuli. This study examined whether anxiety moderates the effect of the positivity bias on attention for threat. The authors employed the dot probe task to compare subliminal and supraliminal attention for threat in 103 young and 44 older adults. Regardless of anxiety, older but not young adults demonstrated a vigilant–avoidant response to angry faces. Anxiety influenced older adults’ attention such that anxious individuals demonstrated a vigilant–avoidant reaction to sad faces but an avoidant–vigilant reaction to negative words.
Keyword Aging
Attentional bias
Dot probe
Anxiety
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 26 Jan 2012, 03:34:06 EST by Mr Mathew Carter on behalf of School of Psychology