InnovationXchange: A case study in innovation intermediation

Håkanson, Lars, Caessens, Petra and Macaulay, Sam (2011) InnovationXchange: A case study in innovation intermediation. Innovation: Management, Policy and Practice, 13 2: 261-274. doi:10.5172/impp.2011.13.2.261

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Author Håkanson, Lars
Caessens, Petra
Macaulay, Sam
Title InnovationXchange: A case study in innovation intermediation
Journal name Innovation: Management, Policy and Practice   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-1266
1447-9338
Publication date 2011-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.5172/impp.2011.13.2.261
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 13
Issue 2
Start page 261
End page 274
Total pages 14
Place of publication Maleny, QLD, Australia
Publisher eContent Management
Language eng
Subject 1405 Management of Technology and Innovation
Abstract Knowledge intermediation can create otherwise unobtainable value when potentially profitable knowledge combinations do not occur because the search costs required to discover them are too high and/or the risks and costs of opportunistic behavior prevents the knowledge disclosure required to identify and/or pursue them. Based on a case study of the Australian operation of the InnovationXchange (IXC), an innovation intermediary, this paper identifies three sets of core intermediation competences - network spanning capability, organizational memory and credibility and skills as a mediator. It describes the practices employed by IXC to develop and sustain these capabilities, enabling it to (1) search for and match partners and facilitate knowledge sharing across geographical, industry and disciplinary boundaries at lower cost and more effectively than its clients can do on their own, and to (2) mitigate risks of opportunistic behavior, IP contamination and reputational damage that prevent agents from engaging in direct contact.
Formatted abstract
Knowledge intermediation can create otherwise unobtainable value when potentially profitable knowledge combinations do not occur because the search costs required to discover them are too high and/or the risks and costs of opportunistic behavior prevents the knowledge disclosure required to identify and/or pursue them. Based on a case study of the Australian operation of the InnovationXchange (IXC), an innovation intermediary, this paper identifies three sets of core intermediation competences – network spanning capability, organizational memory and credibility and skills as a mediator. It describes the practices employed by IXC to develop and sustain these capabilities, enabling it to: (1) search for and match partners and facilitate knowledge sharing across geographical, industry and disciplinary boundaries at lower cost and more effectively than its clients can do on their own; and to (2) mitigate risks of opportunistic behavior, IP contamination and reputational damage that prevent agents from engaging in direct contact. The study provides new insights regarding the organizational capabilities required for successful knowledge brokering, and regarding the types of situations where knowledge intermediaries can provide value by facilitating combinations of knowledge that might otherwise go undetected. The results raise some intriguing issues for future research regarding the mechanisms at work when bridging the thought worlds of different industries, functions and disciplines lacking common cognitive schema, vocabularies and priorities.
Keyword Innovation intermediation
Knowledge intermediation
InnovationXchange
Network spanning
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 24 Jan 2012, 23:52:16 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School