The ecology of star clusters and intermediate-mass black holes in the galactic bulge

Zwart, Simon F. Portegies, Baumgardt, Holger, McMillan, Stephen L. W., Makino, Junichiro, Hut, Piet and Ebisuzaki, Toshi (2006) The ecology of star clusters and intermediate-mass black holes in the galactic bulge. Astrophysical Journal, 641 1: 319-326. doi:10.1086/500361

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Author Zwart, Simon F. Portegies
Baumgardt, Holger
McMillan, Stephen L. W.
Makino, Junichiro
Hut, Piet
Ebisuzaki, Toshi
Title The ecology of star clusters and intermediate-mass black holes in the galactic bulge
Journal name Astrophysical Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-637X
1538-4357
Publication date 2006-04-10
Year available 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/500361
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 641
Issue 1
Start page 319
End page 326
Total pages 8
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Institute of Physics Publishing
Language eng
Abstract We simulate the inner 100 pc of the Milky Way to study the formation and evolution of the population of star clusters and intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). For this study we perform extensive direct N-body simulations of the star clusters that reside in the bulge, and of the inner few tenth of parsecs of the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center. In our N-body simulations the dynamical friction of the star cluster in the tidal field of the bulge are taken into account via semianalytic solutions. The N-body calculations are used to calibrate a semianalytic model of the formation and evolution of the bulge. We find that similar to 10% of the clusters born within similar to 100 pc of the Galactic center undergo core collapse during their inward migration and form IMBHs via runaway stellar merging. After the clusters dissolve, these IMBHs continue their inward drift, carrying a few of the most massive stars with them. We predict that a region within similar to 10 pc of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) is populated by similar to 50 IMBHs of similar to 1000 M-circle dot. Several of these are still expected to be accompanied by some of the most massive stars from the star cluster. We also find that within a few milliparsecs of the SMBH there is a steady population of several IMBHs. This population drives the merger rate between IMBHs and the SMBH at a rate of about one per 10 Myr, sufficient to build the accumulated majority of mass of the SMBH. Mergers of IMBHs with SMBHs throughout the universe are detectable by LISA at a rate of about two per week.
Formatted abstract
We simulate the inner 100 pc of the Milky Way to study the formation and evolution of the population of star clusters and intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). For this study we perform extensive direct N-body simulations of the star clusters that reside in the bulge, and of the inner few tenth of parsecs of the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center. In our N-body simulations the dynamical friction of the star cluster in the tidal field of the bulge are taken into account via semianalytic solutions. The N-body calculations are used to calibrate a semianalytic model of the formation and evolution of the bulge. We find that ~10% of the clusters born within ~100 pc of the Galactic center undergo core collapse during their inward migration and form IMBHs via runaway stellar merging. After the clusters dissolve, these IMBHs continue their inward drift, carrying a few of the most massive stars with them. We predict that a region within ~10 pc of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) is populated by ~50 IMBHs of ~1000 Msun. Several of these are still expected to be accompanied by some of the most massive stars from the star cluster. We also find that within a few milliparsecs of the SMBH there is a steady population of several IMBHs. This population drives the merger rate between IMBHs and the SMBH at a rate of about one per 10 Myr, sufficient to build the accumulated majority of mass of the SMBH. Mergers of IMBHs with SMBHs throughout the universe are detectable by LISA at a rate of about two per week.
Keyword black hole physics
Galaxy : center
Sagittarius A *
Line driven winds
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Mathematics and Physics
ERA 2012 Admin Only
 
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