When peer support may be most beneficial: the relationship between upward comparison and perceived threat

Legg, Melissa, Occhipinti, S, Ferguson, M, Dunn, J and Chambers, S. K. (2011) When peer support may be most beneficial: the relationship between upward comparison and perceived threat. Psycho-Oncology, 20 12: 1358-1362. doi:10.1002/pon.1862


Author Legg, Melissa
Occhipinti, S
Ferguson, M
Dunn, J
Chambers, S. K.
Title When peer support may be most beneficial: the relationship between upward comparison and perceived threat
Journal name Psycho-Oncology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1057-9249
1099-1611
Publication date 2011-12-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/pon.1862
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 20
Issue 12
Start page 1358
End page 1362
Total pages 5
Place of publication West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: Currently, the mechanism by which dyadic peer support programs may facilitate positive psychological adjustment for cancer patients is unclear. This study utilized social comparison theory to examine the effects of peer support on the psychological adjustment of women with breast cancer.

Methods
: A cross-sectional survey of 251 recently diagnosed breast cancer patients (52% response), who had received a dyadic peer support intervention, was undertaken assessing anxiety, depression, perceived threat, and upward comparison.

Results: Perceived cancer threat significantly moderated the relationship between positive upward comparison and depression levels (p = 0.017). Women who engaged in upward comparisons and who perceived their diagnosis to be more threatening had lower depression levels than women who were less threatened.

Conclusions: Peer support services that provide support from cancer survivors may be especially beneficial for people who appraise their cancer diagnosis as more threatening. The application of theoretical models to future evaluation designs will further increase understanding of the psychological mechanisms involved in the effects of peer support and inform program development.
Keyword Oncology
Cancer
Peer support
Social comparison
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Online publication date was different to the year of print publication. Online publication date was 20 October, 2010.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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