Selection, breeding and engineering of microalgae for bioenergy and biofuel production

Larkum, Anthony W. D., Ross, Ian L., Kruse, Olaf and Hankamer, Ben (2012) Selection, breeding and engineering of microalgae for bioenergy and biofuel production. Trends in Biotechnology, 30 4: 198-205. doi:10.1016/j.tibtech.2011.11.003

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Larkum, Anthony W. D.
Ross, Ian L.
Kruse, Olaf
Hankamer, Ben
Title Selection, breeding and engineering of microalgae for bioenergy and biofuel production
Journal name Trends in Biotechnology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0167-7799
Publication date 2012-04-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.tibtech.2011.11.003
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 30
Issue 4
Start page 198
End page 205
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher Elsevier; Trends Journals
Language eng
Subject 1305 Biotechnology
1502 Bioengineering
Abstract Microalgal production technologies are seen as increasingly attractive for bioenergy production to improve fuel security and reduce CO2 emissions. Photosynthetically derived fuels are a renewable, potentially carbon-neutral and scalable alternative reserve. Microalgae have particular promise because they can be produced on non-arable land and utilize saline and wastewater streams. Furthermore, emerging microalgal technologies can be used to produce a range of products such as biofuels, protein-rich animal feeds, chemical feedstocks (e.g. bio-plastic precursors) and higher-value products. This review focuses on the selection, breeding and engineering of microalgae for improved biomass and biofuel conversion efficiencies.
Formatted abstract
Microalgal production technologies are seen as increasingly attractive for bioenergy production to improve fuel security and reduce CO2 emissions. Photosynthetically derived fuels are a renewable, potentially carbon-neutral and scalable alternative reserve. Microalgae have particular promise because they can be produced on non-arable land and utilize saline and wastewater streams. Furthermore, emerging microalgal technologies can be used to produce a range of products such as biofuels, protein-rich animal feeds, chemical feedstocks (e.g. bioplastic precursors) and higher-value products. This review focuses on the selection, breeding and engineering of microalgae for improved biomass and biofuel conversion efficiencies.
Keyword Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
BIOTECHNOLOGY & APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID KR1586/4
212508
0315265A
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 16 December 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 103 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 126 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 17 Jan 2012, 00:58:32 EST by Susan Allen on behalf of Institute for Molecular Bioscience