Correlates of sitting time in working age Australian women: Who should be targeted with interventions to decrease sitting time?

van Uffelen, Jannique G. Z., Heesch, Kristiann C. and Brown, Wendy (2012) Correlates of sitting time in working age Australian women: Who should be targeted with interventions to decrease sitting time?. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 9 2: 270-287.

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Author van Uffelen, Jannique G. Z.
Heesch, Kristiann C.
Brown, Wendy
Title Correlates of sitting time in working age Australian women: Who should be targeted with interventions to decrease sitting time?
Journal name Journal of Physical Activity and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5476
Publication date 2012-02-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 9
Issue 2
Start page 270
End page 287
Total pages 18
Place of publication Champaign, IL, U.S.A.
Publisher Human Kinetics
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: While there is emerging evidence that sedentary behavior is negatively associated with health risk, research on the correlates of sitting time in adults is scarce.

Methods:
Self-report data from 7,724 women born between 1973-1978 and 8,198 women born between 1946-1951 were collected as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Linear regression models were computed to examine whether demographic, family and caring duties, time use, health and health behavior variables were associated with weekday sitting time.

Results:
Mean sitting time (SD) was 6.60 (3.32) hours/day for the 1973-1978 cohort and 5.70 (3.04) hours/day for the 1946-1951 cohort. Indicators of socio-economic advantage, such as full-time work and skilled occupations in both cohorts and university education in the mid-age cohort, were associated with high sitting time. A cluster of „healthy behaviours‟ was associated with lower sitting time in the mid-aged women (moderate/high physical activity levels, non-smoking, non-drinking). For both cohorts, sitting time was highest in women in full-time work, in skilled occupations and in those who spent the most time in passive leisure.

Conclusions:
The results suggest that, in young and mid-aged women, interventions for reducing sitting time should focus on both occupational and leisure-time sitting.
Keyword Sedentary behaviour
Lifestyle
Observational study
Socio-economic factors
Health behaviours
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 14 Jan 2012, 22:17:53 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences