Pelagic fishing at 42,000 years before the present and the maritime skills of modern humans

O'Connor, Sue, Ono, Rintaro and Clarkson, Chris (2011) Pelagic fishing at 42,000 years before the present and the maritime skills of modern humans. Science, 334 6059: 1117-1121. doi:10.1126/science.1207703

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Author O'Connor, Sue
Ono, Rintaro
Clarkson, Chris
Title Pelagic fishing at 42,000 years before the present and the maritime skills of modern humans
Journal name Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0036-8075
1095-9203
Publication date 2011-11-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1126/science.1207703
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 334
Issue 6059
Start page 1117
End page 1121
Total pages 6
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Association for the Advancement of Science
Language eng
Abstract By 50,000 years ago, it is clear that modern humans were capable of long-distance sea travel as they colonized Australia. However, evidence for advanced maritime skills, and for fishing in particular, is rare before the terminal Pleistocene/early Holocene. Here we report remains of a variety of pelagic and other fish species dating to 42,000 years before the present from Jerimalai shelter in East Timor, as well as the earliest definite evidence for fishhook manufacture in the world. Capturing pelagic fish such as tuna requires high levels of planning and complex maritime technology. The evidence implies that the inhabitants were fishing in the deep sea.
Keyword East Timor
South-Africa
Pleistocene
Exploitation
Strategies
Resources
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DP0556210
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 19 Dec 2011, 02:40:33 EST by System User on behalf of School of Social Science