Traumatic injury and traumatic stress

Kenardy, Justin A. and Dunne, Rachael (2011) Traumatic injury and traumatic stress. Spine, 36 25S: S233-S237. doi:10.1097/BRS.0b013e3182387fcd


Author Kenardy, Justin A.
Dunne, Rachael
Title Traumatic injury and traumatic stress
Journal name Spine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0362-2436
Publication date 2011-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/BRS.0b013e3182387fcd
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 36
Issue 25S
Start page S233
End page S237
Total pages 5
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Abstract To review findings from recent research in consideration of relevant theoretical models between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and pain, and to review emerging interventions and prevention options for PTSD in individuals with whiplash.

A traumatic accident may lead to whiplash injury, but can also frequently lead to post-traumatic stress. There is concern that this occurrence is more problematic than each disorder separately. Furthermore, it is unclear why this might occur. This review addresses two mechanisms that might explain this, specifically arousal and pain.

There is a growing body of research revealing relationships between injury, pain and psychological trauma with important implications for the prevention and management of chronic pain and post-traumatic reactions. Intervention for PTSD in the context of whiplash has been shown to be effective, and seems to have a beneficial effect on the whiplash injury. The intervention for traumatic stress in acute whiplash presents further challenges.

This chapter will review findings from recent research in consideration of relevant theoretical models between PTSD and pain in general and more specifically in the case of pain resulting from whiplash injury. A review of emerging interventions and prevention options for PTSD in individuals with whiplash will also be discussed to provide a basis for treatment of individuals and future research.

Recent work in this area suggests that stress, pain and arousal interact through the effects of tissue injury and the distress in response to perceived threat. Post-traumatic stress plays an important role in a significant proportion of whiplash sufferers as its presence seems to deleteriously impact recovery.

Intervention for PTSD in the context of whiplash has been shown to be effective, and seems to have a beneficial effect on the whiplash injury. The intervention for traumatic stress in acute whiplash presents further challenges.
Formatted abstract
Study Design.
To review fi ndings from recent research in consideration of relevant theoretical models between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and pain, and to review emerging interventions and prevention options for PTSD in individuals with whiplash.

Objective.
A traumatic accident may lead to whiplash injury, but can also frequently lead to post-traumatic stress. There is concern that this occurrence is more problematic than each disorder separately. Furthermore, it is unclear why this might occur. This review addresses two mechanisms that might explain this, specifi cally arousal and pain.

Summary of Background Data.

There is a growing body of research revealing relationships between injury, pain and psychological trauma with important implications for the prevention and management of chronic pain and post-traumatic reactions. Intervention for PTSD in the context of whiplash has been shown to be effective, and seems to have a benefi cial effect on the whiplash injury. The intervention for traumatic stress in acute whiplash presents further challenges.

Methods.
This chapter will review fi ndings from recent research in consideration of relevant theoretical models between PTSD and pain in general and more specifi cally in the case of pain resulting from whiplash injury. A review of emerging interventions and prevention options for PTSD in individuals with whiplash will also be discussed to provide a basis for treatment of individuals and future research.

Results.

Recent work in this area suggests that stress, pain and arousal interact through the effects of tissue injury and the distress in response to perceived threat. Post-traumatic stress plays an important role in a signifi cant proportion of whiplash sufferers as its presence seems to deleteriously impact recovery.

Conclusion.

Intervention for PTSD in the context of whiplash has been shown to be effective, and seems to have a benefi cial effect on the whiplash injury. The intervention for traumatic stress in acute whiplash presents further challenges.
Keyword Post-traumatic stress disorder
Whiplash
Pain
Arousal
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 13 Dec 2011, 23:10:02 EST by Chesne McGrath on behalf of Medicine - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital