Tactile stimulation lowers stress in fish

Soares, Marta C., Oliveira, Rui F., Ros, Albert F.H., Grutter, Alexandra S. and Bshary, Redouan (2011) Tactile stimulation lowers stress in fish. Nature Communications, 2 1: 534.1-534.10. doi:10.1038/ncomms1547

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Author Soares, Marta C.
Oliveira, Rui F.
Ros, Albert F.H.
Grutter, Alexandra S.
Bshary, Redouan
Title Tactile stimulation lowers stress in fish
Journal name Nature Communications   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2041-1723
Publication date 2011-11-15
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/ncomms1547
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 2
Issue 1
Start page 534.1
End page 534.10
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract In humans, physical stimulation, such as massage therapy, reduces stress and has demonstrable health benefits. Grooming in primates may have similar effects but it remains unclear whether the positive effects are due to physical contact or to its social value. Here we show that physical stimulation reduces stress in a coral reef fish, the surgeonfish Ctenochaetus striatus. These fish regularly visit cleaner wrasses Labroides dimidiatus to have ectoparasites removed. The cleanerfish influences client decisions by physically touching the surgeonfish with its pectoral and pelvic fins, a behaviour known as tactile stimulation. We simulated this behaviour by exposing surgeonfish to mechanically moving cleanerfish models. Surgeonfish had significantly lower levels of cortisol when stimulated by moving models compared with controls with access to stationary models. Our results show that physical contact alone, without a social aspect, is enough to produce fitness-enhancing benefits, a situation so far only demonstrated in humans.
Keyword Biological Sciences
Ecology
Evolution
Neuroscience
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article # 534

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 32 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 08 Dec 2011, 01:37:33 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences