Dietary patterns and cardiovascular risk markers in the UK Low Income Diet and Nutrition Survey

Hamer, M. and Mishra, G. D. (2010) Dietary patterns and cardiovascular risk markers in the UK Low Income Diet and Nutrition Survey. Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, 20 7: 491-497. doi:10.1016/j.numecd.2009.05.002


Author Hamer, M.
Mishra, G. D.
Title Dietary patterns and cardiovascular risk markers in the UK Low Income Diet and Nutrition Survey
Journal name Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0939-4753
1590-3729
Publication date 2010-09-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.numecd.2009.05.002
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 20
Issue 7
Start page 491
End page 497
Total pages 7
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Background and aim: Dietary patterns have been associated with various disease risk markers. There is presently little representative data about the dietary patterns of adults on low income. The objective was therefore to identify dietary patterns and how they relate to cardiovascular (CVD) risk markers in this specific population.
Formatted abstract
Background and aim: Dietary patterns have been associated with various disease risk markers. There is presently little representative data about the dietary patterns of adults on low income. The objective was therefore to identify dietary patterns and how they relate to cardiovascular (CVD) risk markers in this specific population.
Methods and results: Exploratory factor analysis was performed to examine dietary patterns in participants from the UK Low Income Diet and Nutrition Survey (n = 2931, aged 49.4 ± 20.2 years, 65% female). Dietary intake was assessed from three 24 h dietary recalls and blood was drawn for the assessment of CVD risk markers (C-reactive protein [CRP], total and high density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol, triglycerides, homocysteine). Results of the factor analysis revealed four interpretable principle components accounting for approximately 16.5% of the total variance, with similar patterns across gender. A ‘fast food’ diet pattern explained the greatest proportion of the variance (5.5%), followed by ‘health aware’ (4.1%), ‘traditional’ (3.6%), and ‘sweet’ (3.3%) factors. Participants consuming more items from the fast food pattern were younger, more likely to be smokers and employed, but not partnered. The ‘health aware’ diet pattern was inversely associated with concentrations of CRP and homocysteine, and positively with HDL-cholesterol.
Conclusions: A fast food dietary pattern, high in saturated fat, explained the greatest proportion of the variance in a representative sample of adults on low income from the UK. There was, however, considerable heterogeneity in dietary intake among this socially deprived group and healthy eating was associated with lower CVD risk markers.
Keyword Diet pattern
Low income
Cardiovascular risk markers
Fast food
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Available online 18 August 2009

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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