Estimation of evaporation and sensible heat flux from open water using a large-aperture scintillometer

McJannet, D. L., Cook, F. J., McGloin, R. P., McGowan, H. A. and Burn, S. (2011) Estimation of evaporation and sensible heat flux from open water using a large-aperture scintillometer. Water Resources Research, 47 5: W05545.1-W05545.14. doi:10.1029/2010WR010155

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Author McJannet, D. L.
Cook, F. J.
McGloin, R. P.
McGowan, H. A.
Burn, S.
Title Estimation of evaporation and sensible heat flux from open water using a large-aperture scintillometer
Journal name Water Resources Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0043-1397
1944-7973
Publication date 2011-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1029/2010WR010155
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 47
Issue 5
Start page W05545.1
End page W05545.14
Total pages 14
Place of publication Washington, U.S.A.
Publisher American Geophysical Union
Language eng
Subject 2312 Water Science and Technology
Abstract The use of scintillometers to determine sensible and latent heat flux is becoming increasingly common because of their ability to quantify convective fluxes over distances of hundreds of meters to several kilometers. The majority of investigations using scintillometry have focused on processes above land surfaces, but here we propose a new methodology for obtaining sensible and latent heat fluxes from a scintillometer deployed over open water. This methodology has been tested by comparison with eddy covariance measurements and through comparison with alternative scintillometer calculation approaches that are commonly used in the literature. The methodology is based on linearization of the Bowen ratio, which is a common assumption in models such as Penman's model and its derivatives. Comparison of latent heat flux estimates from the eddy covariance system and the scintillometer showed excellent agreement across a range of weather conditions and flux rates, giving a high level of confidence in scintillometry-derived latent heat fluxes. The proposed approach produced better estimates than other scintillometry calculation methods because of the reliance of alternative methods on measurements of water temperature or water body heat storage, which are both notoriously hard to quantify. The proposed methodology requires less instrumentation than alternative scintillometer calculation approaches, and the spatial scales of required measurements are arguably more compatible. In addition to scintillometer measurements of the structure parameter of the refractive index of air, the only measurements required are atmospheric pressure, air temperature, humidity, and wind speed at one height over the water body.
Formatted abstract
The use of scintillometers to determine sensible and latent heat flux is becoming increasingly common because of their ability to quantify convective fluxes over distances of hundreds of meters to several kilometers. The majority of investigations using scintillometry have focused on processes above land surfaces, but here we propose a new methodology for obtaining sensible and latent heat fluxes from a scintillometer deployed over open water. This methodology has been tested by comparison with eddy covariance measurements and through comparison with alternative scintillometer calculation approaches that are commonly used in the literature. The methodology is based on linearization of the Bowen ratio, which is a common assumption in models such as Penman's model and its derivatives. Comparison of latent heat flux estimates from the eddy covariance system and the scintillometer showed excellent agreement across a range of weather conditions and flux rates, giving a high level of confidence in scintillometry-derived latent heat fluxes. The proposed approach produced better estimates than other scintillometry calculation methods because of the reliance of alternative methods on measurements of water temperature or water body heat storage, which are both notoriously hard to quantify. The proposed methodology requires less instrumentation than alternative scintillometer calculation approaches, and the spatial scales of required measurements are arguably more compatible. In addition to scintillometer measurements of the structure parameter of the refractive index of air, the only measurements required are atmospheric pressure, air temperature, humidity, and wind speed at one height over the water body.
Keyword Refractive-index
Eddy-covariance
Scintillation measurements,
Lake evaporation
Surface fluxes,
Energy budget
Variability
Vapor
Area
Fluctuations
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
Official 2012 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 17 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 21 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sat, 12 Nov 2011, 01:44:49 EST by Alexandra Simmonds on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management