Autologous olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation in human spinal cord injury

Feron, F., Perry, C., Cochrane, J., Licina, P., Nowitzke, A., Urquhart, S., Geraghty, T. and Mackay-Sim, A. (2005) Autologous olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation in human spinal cord injury. Brain, 128 12: 2951-2960. doi:10.1093/brain/awh657


Author Feron, F.
Perry, C.
Cochrane, J.
Licina, P.
Nowitzke, A.
Urquhart, S.
Geraghty, T.
Mackay-Sim, A.
Title Autologous olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation in human spinal cord injury
Journal name Brain   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0006-8950
1460-2156
Publication date 2005-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/brain/awh657
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 128
Issue 12
Start page 2951
End page 2960
Total pages 10
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Olfactory ensheathing cells transplanted into the injured spinal cord in animals promote regeneration and remyelination of descending motor pathways through the site of injury and the return of motor functions. In a single-blind, Phase I clinical trial, we aimed to test the feasibility and safety of transplantation of autologous olfactory ensheathing cells into the injured spinal cord in human paraplegia. Participants were three male paraplegics, 18–55 years of age, with stable, complete thoracic injuries 6–32 months previously, with stable spinal column, no implanted prostheses, and no syrinx. Olfactory ensheathing cells were grown and purified in vitro from nasal biopsies and injected into the region of damaged spinal cord. The trial design includes a matched injury group as a control for the assessors, who are blind to treatment status. Assessments, made before transplantation and at regular intervals subsequently, include MRI, medical, neurological and psychosocial assessments, and standard American Spinal Injury Association and Functional Independence Measure assessments. One year after cell implantation, there were no medical, surgical or other complications to indicate that the procedure is unsafe. There is no evidence of spinal cord damage nor of cyst, syrinx or tumour formation. There was no neuropathic pain reported by the participants, no change in psychosocial status and no evidence of deterioration in neurological status. Participants will be followed for 3 years to confirm long-term safety and to compare neurological, functional and psychosocial outcomes with the control group. We conclude transplantation of autologous olfactory ensheathing cells into the injured spinal cord is feasible and is safe up to one year post-implantation.
Keyword Human
Transplantation
Spinal cord injury
Paraplegia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 273 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 306 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 09 Nov 2011, 22:39:09 EST by Miss Kristy Reid on behalf of School of Medicine