The impact of Western science and technology on Ukiyo-e prints and book illustrations in late eighteenth and nineteenth century Japan

Low, Morris (2011) The impact of Western science and technology on Ukiyo-e prints and book illustrations in late eighteenth and nineteenth century Japan. Historia Scientiarum, 21 1: 66-87.

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Author Low, Morris
Title The impact of Western science and technology on Ukiyo-e prints and book illustrations in late eighteenth and nineteenth century Japan
Journal name Historia Scientiarum   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0285-4821
Publication date 2011-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 21
Issue 1
Start page 66
End page 87
Total pages 22
Place of publication Tokyo, Japan
Publisher Nihon Kagakushi Gakkai
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In the Edo period (c. 1600(1868), exposure to Western art, science and technology encouraged Japanese ukiyo-e (pictures of the tloating world) artists to experiment with Western perspective in woodblock prints and book illustrations. We can sec its early influence in the work of Hiroshige Kuniyoshi (1797-1858), as well as Utagawa Kuniyoshi(1797-1861). Unlike Hiroshige, Kuniyoshi lived to see the opening of the port of Yokohama to trade with the West in 1859. A whole genre of Yokohama prints emerged and one of the key artists was Utagawa Sadahide (1807-1873). In his illustrated books entitled Yokohama kaiko Kenbunshi (A Record of Things Seen and Heard in the Open Port of Yokohama) (1862), Sadahide plays with perspective in an effort to represent the dynamic changes that Japan was undergoing in its encounter with the West at the time. In the work of later artists such as Hiroshige III (1843-1894), Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847-1915)
and Inoue Yasuji (1864-1889), we can see growing efforts 10 depict light, shadow and depth, and a continuing fascination with the steam locomotie and the changes occuring in the Tokyo-Yokohama region as Japan entered the Meiji period (1868-1912).
Keyword Japanese art
ukiyo-e
Woodblock prints
Meiji period
Science and technology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Special issue: Encounters with the West: Science, Technology and Visual Culture in East Asia from the 18th to the 19th Century

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Languages and Cultures Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 02 Nov 2011, 21:40:09 EST by Meredith Downes on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures