Micronutrients: highlights and research challenges from the 1994-5 National Diet and Nutrition Survey of people aged 65 years and over

Bates, C.J., Prentice, A., Cole, T.J., van der Pols, J.C., Doyle, W., Finch, S., Smithers, G. and Clarke, P.C. (1999) Micronutrients: highlights and research challenges from the 1994-5 National Diet and Nutrition Survey of people aged 65 years and over. British Journal of Nutrition, 82 1: 7-15.

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Author Bates, C.J.
Prentice, A.
Cole, T.J.
van der Pols, J.C.
Doyle, W.
Finch, S.
Smithers, G.
Clarke, P.C.
Title Micronutrients: highlights and research challenges from the 1994-5 National Diet and Nutrition Survey of people aged 65 years and over
Journal name British Journal of Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0007-1145
Publication date 1999-01-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 82
Issue 1
Start page 7
End page 15
Total pages 9
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Abstract The aims of the National Diet and Nutrition Survey series are summarized, and the new National Diet and Nutrition Survey of people aged 65 years and over is explored, with particular emphasis on micronutrient intakes and status indices. Mean nutrient intakes were generally satisfactory for most micronutrients, but intakes of vitamin D, Mg, K and Cu were low. Intakes of vitamin D were far below the reference nutrient intake for people aged 65 years and over, and there was also biochemical evidence of vitamin D deficiency, for 8% of free-living and 37% of institution participants, attributed partly to limited exposure to sunlight. A substantial proportion of people living in institutions had inadequate biochemical status indices, notably for vitamin C, Fe and folate. Relationships between intake and status were close for vitamins. Mineral intakes did not correlate well with currently used status indices. Some intakes and indices, especially those of vitamin C, carotenoids, Na and K, were strongly correlated with socio-economic status and with north-south gradients in Britain. Future research challenges should address the functional and health significance of low intakes and sub-optimal biochemical indices for certain micronutrients, especially for people living in institutions; the shortcomings of mineral status indices especially as indicators of mineral intake; the social and geographical inequalities of micronutrient intakes and status, and why micronutrient status deteriorates with increasing age. The answers to these questions will help to define the characteristics of nutritional risk for older people in Britain, and to clarify future needs for education and intervention.
Keyword Elderly
Micronutrients
National Diet and Nutrition Survey
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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