Artemisinin-induced dormancy in Plasmodium falciparum: Duration, recovery rates, and implications in treatment failure

Teuscher, Franka, Gatton, Michelle L., Chen, Nanhua, Peters, Jennifer, Kyle, Dennis E. and Cheng, Qin (2010) Artemisinin-induced dormancy in Plasmodium falciparum: Duration, recovery rates, and implications in treatment failure. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 202 9: 1362-1368. doi:10.1086/656476


Author Teuscher, Franka
Gatton, Michelle L.
Chen, Nanhua
Peters, Jennifer
Kyle, Dennis E.
Cheng, Qin
Title Artemisinin-induced dormancy in Plasmodium falciparum: Duration, recovery rates, and implications in treatment failure
Formatted title
Artemisinin-induced dormancy in Plasmodium falciparum: Duration, recovery rates, and implications in treatment failure
Journal name Journal of Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-1899
1537-6613
Publication date 2010-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/656476
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 202
Issue 9
Start page 1362
End page 1368
Total pages 7
Place of publication Cary, NC, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background. Despite the remarkable activity of artemisinin and its derivatives, monotherapy with these agents has been associated with high rates of recrudescence. The temporary arrest of the growth of ring-stage parasites (dormancy) after exposure to artemisinin drugs provides a plausible explanation for this phenomenon.
Methods. Ring-stage parasites of several Plasmodium falciparum lines were exposed to different doses of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) alone or in combination with mefloquine. For each regime, the proportion of recovering parasites was determined daily for 20 days.
Results. Parasite development was abruptly arrested after a single exposure to DHA, with some parasites being dormant for up to 20 days. Approximately 50% of dormant parasites recovered to resume growth within the first 9 days. The overall proportion of parasites recovering was dose dependent, with recovery rates ranging from 0.044% to 1.313%. Repeated treatment with DHA or with DHA in combination with mefloquine led to a delay in recovery and an ∼10-fold reduction in total recovery. Strains with different genetic backgrounds appeared to vary in their capacity to recover.
Conclusions. These results imply that artemisinin-induced arrest of growth occurs readily in laboratory-treated parasites and may be a key factor in P. falciparum malaria treatment failure.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 95 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 100 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 25 Oct 2011, 20:01:38 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health