Insights into the climate of safety towards the prevention of falls among hospital staff

Black, Alex A., Brauer, Sandra G., Bell, Rebecca A. R., Economidis, Alyssia J. and Haines, Terry P. (2011) Insights into the climate of safety towards the prevention of falls among hospital staff. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 20 19-20: 2924-2930. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2702.2010.03535.x


Author Black, Alex A.
Brauer, Sandra G.
Bell, Rebecca A. R.
Economidis, Alyssia J.
Haines, Terry P.
Title Insights into the climate of safety towards the prevention of falls among hospital staff
Journal name Journal of Clinical Nursing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-1067
1365-2702
Publication date 2011-10-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2010.03535.x
Volume 20
Issue 19-20
Start page 2924
End page 2930
Total pages 7
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aims and objectives.  To explore the climate of safety towards falls prevention among frontline hospital staff.
Background.  Falls represent a serious threat to patient safety in hospitals. A positive safety climate is vital in healthcare organisations to promote safe care and reduce patient harm, yet little is known about the safety climate towards falls prevention among frontline staff in the hospital setting.
Design.  An observational descriptive study.
Methods.  Frontline staff working in five acute and subacute wards at two metropolitan hospitals in Australia were sampled. Safety climate towards falls prevention was measured using the Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations survey. The item-specific, dimension-specific and overall percentage of problematic responses were calculated, based on the frequency of responses inconsistent with a positive safety climate. Higher percentage of problematic responses values reflects a weaker safety climate.
Results.  The overall percentage of problematic responses towards falls prevention was 15%. Dimensions that were most inconsistent with a positive safety climate included ‘provision of safe care’ (percentage of problematic responses 42·1%) and ‘unit recognition and support for safety efforts’ (percentage of problematic responses 26·9%). The overall and dimension-specific percentage of problematic responses scores did not vary by hospital, or between nursing and allied health disciplines.
Conclusions.  The study provides important insights into the safety climate towards falls prevention among frontline hospital staff. Further research is required to improve the problematic areas of safety climate towards falls prevention, to promote and deliver safe patient care by hospital healthcare teams.
Relevance to clinical practice.  Identifying problematic areas in the safety climate towards falls prevention is a first step in guiding the development of targeted strategies to promote a positive atmosphere towards preventing falls and reducing patient harm in the hospital setting.
Keyword Accidental falls
Attitudes
Falls prevention
Hospital
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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