Effects of face-to-face restorative justice on victims of crime in four randomized, controlled trials

Sherman, Lawrence W, Strang, Heather, Angel, Caroline, Woods, Daniel, Barnes, Geoffrey C., Bennett, Sarah, Inkpen, N. and Rossner, M. (2005) Effects of face-to-face restorative justice on victims of crime in four randomized, controlled trials. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 1 3: 367-395. doi:10.1007/s11292-005-8126-y

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Author Sherman, Lawrence W
Strang, Heather
Angel, Caroline
Woods, Daniel
Barnes, Geoffrey C.
Bennett, Sarah
Inkpen, N.
Rossner, M.
Title Effects of face-to-face restorative justice on victims of crime in four randomized, controlled trials
Journal name Journal of Experimental Criminology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1573-3750
1572-8315
Publication date 2005-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11292-005-8126-y
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 1
Issue 3
Start page 367
End page 395
Total pages 9
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Language eng
Abstract The growing use of restorative justice provides a major opportunity for experimental criminology and evidence-based policy. Face-to-face meetings led by police officers between crime victims and their offenders are predicted to reduce the harm to victims caused by the crime. This prediction is derived not only from the social movement for restorative justice, but also from the microsociology of interaction rituals (Collins, 2004). Four randomized, controlled trials of this hypothesis in London and Canberra, with point estimates disaggregated by gender, tested the prediction with measures of both successful interaction ritual (apologies received and their perceived sincerity) and the hypothesized benefits of the ritual (on forgiveness of, and reduced desire for violent revenge against, offenders, and victim self-blame for the crime). The meta-analyses of the eight point estimates suggest success (as victims define it) of restorative justice as an interaction ritual, and as a policy for reducing harm to victims.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
ERA 2012 Admin Only
 
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Created: Sat, 22 Oct 2011, 07:11:33 EST by Sarah Bennett on behalf of ISSR - Research Groups