Dopamine in Drosophila: Setting arousal thresholds in a miniature brain

Van Swinderen, Bruno and Andretic, Rozi (2011) Dopamine in Drosophila: Setting arousal thresholds in a miniature brain. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London: Biological Sciences, 278 1707: 906-913. doi:10.1098/rspb.2010.2564


Author Van Swinderen, Bruno
Andretic, Rozi
Title Dopamine in Drosophila: Setting arousal thresholds in a miniature brain
Formatted title
Dopamine in Drosophila: Setting arousal thresholds in a miniature brain
Journal name Proceedings of the Royal Society of London: Biological Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-8452
1471-2954
Publication date 2011-03-22
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2010.2564
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 278
Issue 1707
Start page 906
End page 913
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Language eng
Abstract In mammals, the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) modulates a variety of behaviours, although DA function is mostly associated with motor control and reward. In insects such as the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, DA also modulates a wide array of behaviours, ranging from sleep and locomotion to courtship and learning. How can a single molecule play so many different roles? Adaptive changes within the DA system, anatomical specificity of action and effects on a variety of behaviours highlight the remarkable versatility of this neurotransmitter. Recent genetic and pharmacological manipulations of DA signalling in Drosophila have launched a surfeit of stories-each arguing for modulation of some aspect of the fly's waking (and sleeping) life. Although these stories often seem distinct and unrelated, there are some unifying themes underlying DA function and arousal states in this insect model. One of the central roles played by DA may involve perceptual suppression, a necessary component of both sleep and selective attention.
Formatted abstract
In mammals, the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) modulates a variety of behaviours, although DA function is mostly associated with motor control and reward. In insects such as the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, DA also modulates a wide array of behaviours, ranging from sleep and locomotion to courtship and learning. How can a single molecule play so many different roles? Adaptive changes within the DA system, anatomical specificity of action and effects on a variety of behaviours highlight the remarkable versatility of this neurotransmitter. Recent genetic and pharmacological manipulations of DA signalling in Drosophila have launched a surfeit of stories—each arguing for modulation of some aspect of the fly's waking (and sleeping) life. Although these stories often seem distinct and unrelated, there are some unifying themes underlying DA function and arousal states in this insect model. One of the central roles played by DA may involve perceptual suppression, a necessary component of both sleep and selective attention.
Keyword Drosophila
Dopamine
Arousal
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2012 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 55 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 59 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sat, 22 Oct 2011, 00:47:11 EST by Bruno Van Swinderen on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute