Schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings share increased resting-state connectivity in the task-negative network but not its anticorrelated task-positive network

Liu, Hailong, Kaneko, Yoshio, Ouyang, Xuan, Li, Li, Hao, Yihui, Chen, Eric Y. H., Tianzi, Jiang, Zhou, Yuan and Liu, Zhening (2012) Schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings share increased resting-state connectivity in the task-negative network but not its anticorrelated task-positive network. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 38 2: 285-294. doi:10.1093/schbul/sbq074


Author Liu, Hailong
Kaneko, Yoshio
Ouyang, Xuan
Li, Li
Hao, Yihui
Chen, Eric Y. H.
Tianzi, Jiang
Zhou, Yuan
Liu, Zhening
Title Schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings share increased resting-state connectivity in the task-negative network but not its anticorrelated task-positive network
Journal name Schizophrenia Bulletin   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0586-7614
1745-1701
Publication date 2012-03-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/schbul/sbq074
Volume 38
Issue 2
Start page 285
End page 294
Total pages 10
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Abnormal connectivity of the anticorrelated intrinsic networks, the task-negative network (TNN), and the task-positive network (TPN) is implicated in schizophrenia. Comparisons between schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings enable further understanding of illness susceptibility and pathophysiology. We examined the resting-state connectivity differences in the intrinsic networks between schizophrenic patients, their unaffected siblings, and healthy controls.
Methods:
Resting-state functional magnetic resonance images were obtained from 25 individuals in each subject group. The posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were used as seed regions to identify the TNN and TPN through functional connectivity analysis. Interregional connectivity strengths were analyzed using overlapped intrinsic networks composed of regions common to all subject groups.
Results:
Schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings showed increased connectivity in the TNN between the bilateral inferior temporal gyri. By contrast, schizophrenic patients alone demonstrated increased connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and left inferior temporal gyrus and between the ventral medial prefrontal cortex and right lateral parietal cortex in the TNN. Schizophrenic patients exhibited increased connectivity between the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right inferior frontal gyrus in the TPN relative to their unaffected siblings, though this trend only approached statistical significance in comparison to healthy controls.
Conclusion:
Resting-state hyperconnectivity of the intrinsic networks may disrupt network coordination and thereby contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Similar, though milder, hyperconnectivity of the TNN in unaffected siblings of schizophrenic patients may contribute to the identification of schizophrenia endophenotypes and ultimately to the determination of schizophrenia risk genes.
Keyword Schizophrenia
Unaffected sibling
Default mode networ
Functional connectivity
Resting-state
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes First published online: June 30, 2010

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
ERA 2012 Admin Only
 
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Created: Fri, 21 Oct 2011, 22:54:44 EST by Sylvie Pichelin on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute