Dependence of EPSP efficacy on synapse location in neocortical pyramidal neurons

Williams, Stephen R. and Stuart, Greg J. (2002) Dependence of EPSP efficacy on synapse location in neocortical pyramidal neurons. Science, 295 5561: 1907-1910. doi:10.1126/science.1067903


Author Williams, Stephen R.
Stuart, Greg J.
Title Dependence of EPSP efficacy on synapse location in neocortical pyramidal neurons
Journal name Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0036-8075
1095-9203
Publication date 2002-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1126/science.1067903
Volume 295
Issue 5561
Start page 1907
End page 1910
Total pages 4
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Association for the Advancement of Science
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Neurons receive thousands of synaptic inputs throughout elaborate dendritic trees. Here we determine the somatic impact of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) generated at known dendritic sites in neocortical pyramidal neurons. As inputs became more distal, somatic EPSP amplitude decreased, whereas use-dependent depression increased. Despite marked attenuation (>40-fold), when coactivated within a narrow time window (∼10 milliseconds), distal EPSPs could directly influence action potential output following dendritic spike generation. These findings reveal that distal EPSPs are ineffective sources of background somatic excitation, but through coincidence detection have a powerful transient signaling role.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 195 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 208 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 21 Oct 2011, 03:39:08 EST by Stephen Williams on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute