IncHI plasmids, a dynamic link between resistance and pathogenicity

Phan, Minh-Duy and Wain, John (2008) IncHI plasmids, a dynamic link between resistance and pathogenicity. Journal of Infection in Developing Countries, 2 4: 272-278.

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Author Phan, Minh-Duy
Wain, John
Title IncHI plasmids, a dynamic link between resistance and pathogenicity
Journal name Journal of Infection in Developing Countries   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1972-2680
Publication date 2008-08-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 2
Issue 4
Start page 272
End page 278
Total pages 7
Editor John Wain
Duncan Steele
Place of publication TRAMANIGLIO
Publisher Open Learning on Enteric Pathogens (OLOEP)
Language eng
Abstract Plasmids of incompatibility group (Inc) HI1 are important vectors of antibiotic resistance in both of the major causal agents of enteric fever: Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhi and S. Paratyphi A. In S. Typhi, IncHI1 plasmids appeared in the 1970s and spread globally. In some circumstances they are maintained within the bacterial population even in the absence of selection from antibiotics. The low cost associated with IncH plasmids in Salmonella is due, in part, to the presence of a plasmid gene encoding an H-NS-like global regulator which acts co-operatively with chromosomally encoded H-NS. Very recently, IncHI1 plasmids have crossed from S. Typhi into S. Paratyphi A; the acquisition of drug resistance and possibly other phenotypic traits encoded by IncHI1 plasmids has increased the virulence potential of this neglected pathogen. There is no vaccine for S. Paratyphi A and resistance to the current drugs of choice, the fluoroquinolones, is also spreading rapidly. There is a conserved backbone to all IncH plasmids but variation occurs in regions of the plasmids associated with antibiotic resistance. These IncHI1 plasmids are allowing major human pathogens to sample genes available in their environment, the human gut, and will be maintained by enhancing the competitive advantage of the bacterial host. Therefore competition between closely related resistance plasmids will probably increase the transmission of enteric fever by enhancing the fitness of their bacterial hosts.
Formatted abstract
Plasmids of incompatibility group (Inc) HI1 are important vectors of antibiotic resistance in both of the major causal agents of enteric fever: Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhi and S. Paratyphi A. In S. Typhi, IncHI1 plasmids appeared in the 1970s and spread globally. In some circumstances they are maintained within the bacterial population even in the absence of selection from antibiotics. The low cost associated with IncH plasmids in Salmonella is due, in part, to the presence of a plasmid gene encoding an H-NS-like global regulator which acts co-operatively with chromosomally encoded H-NS. Very recently, IncHI1 plasmids have crossed from S. Typhi into S. Paratyphi A; the acquisition of drug resistance and possibly other phenotypic traits encoded by IncHI1 plasmids has increased the virulence potential of this neglected pathogen. There is no vaccine for S. Paratyphi A and resistance to the current drugs of choice, the fluoroquinolones, is also spreading rapidly. There is a conserved backbone to all IncH plasmids but variation occurs in regions of the plasmids associated with antibiotic resistance. These IncHI1 plasmids are allowing major human pathogens to sample genes available in their environment, the human gut, and will be maintained by enhancing the competitive advantage of the bacterial host. Therefore competition between closely related resistance plasmids will probably increase the transmission of enteric fever by enhancing the fitness of their bacterial hosts
Keyword IncHI1 plasmid
Multidrug resistance
Typhi
Pathogenicity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Special issue on Enteric Fever

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Fri, 21 Oct 2011, 00:23:37 EST by Dr Minh Duy Phan on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences